Monthly Archives: April 2015

Introduction to Burke’s Landed Gentry 1912

EIGHT years having passed, obviously it had become necessary that a new edition of the ” Landed Gentry of Ireland ” should be issued, in order that the genealogical records of the various families appearing in the book might be revised to date, and the happenings of birth, marriage and death, in the interval, be added to the pedigrees.

But one is now confronted with the problem whether there still remains a Landed Gentry at all in that country, so great has been the compulsory alienation of land in Ireland during the last decade.

Whatever may be the decision as to future editions, in the present one there has been no violent disqualification of families because the broad acres of their estates have been contracted to the lands about the mansion house ; in fact, but very few pedigrees have been removed. Although the fascination of the ownership of land land hunger is still a dominant characteristic of the British race, it cannot be said to possess its ancient importance ; and the interest of the public, it seems to me, lies in the families themselves rather than in the extent of their ownership of land. The growth of the new landless plutocracy has shifted the importance of things, and is a factor that must weigh in the future, and be considered in conjunction with absenteeism. But the problem is for the next edition.

Although a number of new and interesting pedigrees are now included in ” Burke ” for the first time the changes in the present volume are chiefly caused by the revision of pedigrees and the occurrences of the interval. The latter have been exceedingly numerous, and I am chiefly indebted to the very many members of the families concerned with whom I have been in correspondence or to whom I have submitted proofs, for an enormous amount of assistance generously given to me. For that my grateful thanks.

In the revision of the pedigrees there will be found a number of important alterations. Some of my most vehement correspondents seem to fancy that “Burke”  is edited by Hans Andersen. That really is quite a mistake. Of course, one knows that every Irishman is the descendant of countless kings, princes and other minor celebrities. One admits it the thing is unquestionable. One knows, of course, also, that every family is the oldest in Co. Galway, or Co. Sligo, or somewhere else, and that, for some reason or other, every Irishman is the ” head ” of his family, and I am growing weary of reading letters which assure me that the mushroom families included in the Landed Gentry pale into insignificance beside the glories of those which are omitted, and I am slowly learning so often am I so assured that all the pedigrees herein are hopelessly wrong. But although I may not have included quite so much as has been desired, I think I may claim that what is inserted may be relied upon. All genealogical works started upon a model of narrative, in which a place might properly be found for supposition and tradition. There has been a gradual transition to exactitude of fact, which is the aim in view, and which I claim has now been reached.

For the present edition every coat-of-arms has been carefully scrutinized and compared with the original records in Ulster’s Office. I believe I can now claim for the Irish volume that, apart from unintentional error, every single one which is quoted herein can be relied upon as borne by unquestionable right. Families to whom no armorial bearings are assigned have none recorded to them in Ulster’s Office.

The publishers have consented to incur the expense of bringing the Landed Gentry into line with the PEERAGE and BARONETAGE by illustrating every coat-of-arms in the book. This must add very greatly to its interest, and I trust their lavish expenditure on this point will receive the reward it merits in the increased appreciation of the public.

I am indebted to Mr. Farnham Burke, C.V.O., C.B., Norroy King of Arms, for much assistance in the preparation of this edition, and I have profited greatly from the kind help and from the labours of Mr. Ashworth Burke, who has resigned the editorship of the present edition, whilst many others have taken much trouble with the single-minded desire for the improvement or the accuracy of the volume. To all I tender my thanks, but above all I am under a deep debt of gratitude to Mr. G. D. Burtchaell, Athlone Pursuivant.

His able and willing assistance have been acknowledged in former editions, but on the present occasion I have had the advantage of his help to an extent little short of a scrutiny of every line in the book. He it is who has examined the arms, and has gone to endless trouble to solve doubts and difficulties as they have become apparent in the pedigrees. I really think his name should be on the title page as editor. Mere words of thanks seem a feeble acknowledgment of what this edition owes to his untiring assistance.

THE EDITOR.

SIR BERNARD BURKE, C.B., ULSTER KING OF ARMS.

New Edition, 1912

REVISED BY A. C. FOX-DAVIES, BARRISTER-AT-LAW.

LONDON :

HARRISON & SONS, 45, PALL MALL, S.W.,

LONDON : HARRISON AND SONS, PRINTERS IN ORDINARY TO HIS MAJESTY,

ST. MARTIN’S LANE.

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ROCHE OF GRANAGH CASTLE AND RYE HILL. -BLG 1912

ROCHE OF GRANAGH CASTLE AND RYE HILL.

STEPHEN REDINGTON ROCHE, of Rye Hill, co. Galway, Granagh Castle, co. Kilkenny, and Moyvanine, co.’Limerick, J.P. co. Galway, b. 14 Nov. 1859 ; m. I Aug. 1903, Lily, youngest dau. of the late George Roche. Washington Brasier-Creagh, of Creagh Castle, Doneraile, and Woodville, Buttevant, co. Cork (see that family).

Lineage. JOHN ROCHE, of Castletown Roche, was a member of the Catholic Parliament or Council held at Kilkenny during the Civil War, and his name appears as such to the declaration of the Irish Roman Catholics, 1641. His eldest son, ROBERT ROCHE, m. Juliana O’Moore, dau. of Alexander O’Moore, and was s. by his eldest son, STEPHEN ROCHE, known by the designation of Dov or Black, from his complexion, whose estate, already injured by composition in the time of CROMWELL, was entirely forfeited under WILLIAM III.

Compelled in consequence to leave co. Cork, he retired to Kilrush, co. Clare, and afterwards took up his abode at Pallas, co. Limerick, in the vicinity of his brother-in-law, William Apjohn. He m, Anastasia, elder dau. and co-heir (with her sister Catherine, who m. William Apjohn) of Thomas Lysaght, and was s. by his son,

JOHN ROCHE, b. 1688 ; m. Anne, youngest dau. of Philip Stackpole, of Mount Cashel, Kilneen, and Kilcoman, co. Clare, and had, with other issue,

1. STEPHEN, his heir.

2. John, m. Miss Harold, cousin of Gen. Harold, of the Saxon service, and had a dau., Mary Anne, m. John Meade, of Limerick.

3. Philip, of Shannon View, co. Limerick, m. Margaret, dau. of John Kelly, of Limerick, and had issue,

I. John, m. Margaret, dau. of Charles’ Whyte, of Leixlip (see WHYTE of Louehbrickland) , and d.v.p., having had issue,

(1) Philip, of Donore, co. Kildare, m. the Hon. Anna Maria Plunkett, dau. of Randall, 1st Lord Dunsany, and by her (who m. zndly, 22 July, 1822, Admiral Ryder Burton, R.N., K.H., and d. 26 April, 1856) had issue,

1. John, Lieut.-Gen. late 2nd Life Guards, m. 3 April, 1869, Agnes Jane, dau. of James Mugford. He d.s.p.

1. Margaret Radaliana, m. 3 Nov. 1836, Thomas, 16th Lord Trimleston. She d. 4 Sept. 1872. He d. 4 Aug. 1879, and had issue (see BURKE’S Peerage). 

2. Anna Maria, m. 20 Nov. 1830, Thomas Oliver, 12th Lord Louth. She d. 18 Jan. 1878. He d. 26 June, 1849, leaving issue.

(2) Charles Whyte, of Ballygran, co. Limerick, m. his first cousin, Letitia, dau. of John Whyte, of Loughbrickland (see that family), and by her had issue,

i. Charles Philip, of Ballygran, Capt. Cavan Militia, b. 1819 ; m. 1861, his cousin, Louisa, dau. of Nicholas Charles Whyte, D.L., of Loughbrickland, Capt. R.N., and d. 10 Nov. 1871, having had issue,

a. Charles Hugh, b. 1863 ; d. unm. 1889.

b. Henry John, Lieut.-Col. Indian Army, b. 12 Aug. 1864.

c. Edward Richard, B.A., A.M.I.C.E., b. 1867.

d. Arthur, b. 1870 ; d. 1892.

a. Letitia Mary, m. 1886, J. Knox Wight, I.C.S.

b. Frances, m. 1899, R. Bodkin Mahon, F.R.C.S.E.

1. Letitia Maria, m. 18 Oct. 1842. Sir John Nugent, 3rd Bart., of Ballinlough, who d. 16 Feb. 1859, leaving issue (see BURKE’S Peerage).

2. Helena Maria, m. 1st, 1845, Richard Barnewall, of Bloomsbury, co. Meath, who d.s.p. 3 Feb. 1866. She m. 2ndly, Vicomte de Chasteigner.

(1) Margaret, m. John Therry, of Castle Therry, co. Cork, sometime Chairman of the Commissioners of Excise in Ireland.

(2) Anna, d. unm.

(3) Mary, m. 12 Oct. 1803, Major William Skerrett, of Finavara, co. Clare, and d. 1821, leaving issue (see that family).

(4) Helen, d. unm.

(5) Fanny, m. James Skerrett, of Carnacron, co. Galway.

(6) Letitia, m. 8 May, 1816, Thomas Kelly, of Shannon View, Limerick, and had issue (see KELLY of Rockstown Castle).

(7) Rose, d. young.

1 . Ellen, m. Peter Daly, of Cloncagh, co. Galway.

2. Mary, m. 15 July, 1783, George Ryan, of Inch, co. Tipperary, and had issue (see that family).

3. Margaret, m. July, 1787, Standish Barry, of Leamlara, and had issue (see that family).

1. Jane, m. John Sheehy, of Cork, and had a dau. m. Bryan Keating, by whom she was mother of General Keating.

2. Christiana, m. James Lombard, of co. Cork.

The eldest son,

STEPHEN ROCHE, b. 5 Dec. 1724 ; s. his father 1760. He m. 1st, Margaret, dau. of Richard Meade, and had issue,

1. JOHN, his successor, one of the most eminent merchants in Dublin, who m. Mary, dau. of Thady Grehan, of that city but d.s.p. Sept. 1825.

2. Richard (Rev.), who d. 1805.

3. George, of Granagh Castle, co. Kilkenny, d.s.p.

1. Anne, m. Peter Long, of Waterford.

2. Mary, m. Peter Grehan, of Dublin, and has issue (see GREHAN of Clonmeen).

Stephen Roche m. 2ndly, Sarah, dau. and co-heir of John O’Brien, of Moyvanine and Clounties, co. Limerick, and by her (who d. 8 Nov. 1786) had issue,

4. STEPHEN, of Moyvanine and Clounties, m. Maria, dau. of John Moylan, of Cork, and had issue,

1. STEPHEN, of Rye Hill.

2. John.

1. Mary, a nun.

2. Sarah, m. Sir John Howley, Serjeant-at-Law, and d. 1856.

3. Anne.

4. Helena.

5. Harriet, m. Daniel Cronin.

5. Thomas, of Limerick, m. Helen, dau. of John Ankettle, and has issue,

1. Stephen, m. Catherine, dau. and co-heir of Christopher Knight, of co. Limerick.

2. John.

3. William, of Dublin, m. Eliza ; dau. and co-heir of Christopher Knight, of co. Limerick.

1. Helen, m. Daniel Ryan Kane, M.A., Q.C., Chairman of Quarter Sessions, E. R. co. Cork, and had issue.

2. Sarah.

6. James, of Cork, author of The Memoirs o/ an Octogenarian, m. Anne, dau. of John Moylan, by whom he left at his decease, two daus.,

1. Marianne.

2. Sarah, m. Collins.

7. William, M.P. for Limerick, m. the dau. of Dillon, and d. in Limerick 1850, having by her had issue,

with a younger son, Henry, d. young, an elder son, James, of Limerick and Great Yarmouth, an Officer of the Customs, m. Ellen, dau. of John Hogan, of Limerick, and had issue,

(1) William, b. in Limerick ; d. at Bury St. Edmunds.

(2) Henry, b. in Limerick ; d. at Great Yarmouth.

(3) James, of Detroit, U.S.A., b. n Feb. 1843; m. and has issue, a son and a dau., Helena Mary, m. 9 Feb. 1897, John Francis O’Brien.

(4) John, b. at Great Yarmouth ; d. in London.

(1) Anne.

(2) Julia, a nun at Skipton, Yorks.

(3) Helena. (4) Mary.

3. Sarah, m. Francis French, of Portcarran, co. Galway, who d.s.p.

4. Helen, m. Denis O’Meagher, of Kilmoyler, co. Tipperary, who is dec.

5. Anastasia, m. Edward O’Meagher, of Marl Hill, co. Tipperary.

Stephen Roche m. 3rdly, Mary Anne, dau. and co-heir of Richard Ankettle, M.D., but by her (who d. Dec. 1821) he had no issue.

He d. 12 Feb. 1804, and was s. by his grandson,

STEPHEN ROCHE, of Granagh Castle, co. Kilkenny, and Rye Hill, co. Galway, m. 1832, Eleanor, eldest dau. and co-heir of Thomas Redington, of Rye Hill, co. Galway, and by her (who d. 1891) had issue,

1 THOMAS REDINGTON, late of Rye Hill.

2. Stephen, d. unm. 1853.

1. Eleanor, d unm. 1855.

Mr. Roche d. 4 Sept. 1864, and was s. by his eldest son,

THOMAS REDINGTON ROCHE, of Rye Hill, co. Galway, Granagh Castle, co. Kilkenny, and Moyvanine, of Limerick, J.P. and D.L. High Sheriff co. Galway 1869, b. 14 July, 1837 ; m. 8 Sept. 1858, Jane Elizabeth, 5th dau. of Anthony Cliffe, of Bellevue, co.Wexford, and d. 10 May, 1900, leaving issue,

1. STEPHEN REDINGTON, now of Rye Hill.

2. Anthony, b. 16 April, 1862.

3. Thomas James, b. 25 July, 1863.

4. Charles, b. 16 Sept. 1867 ; d. 25 May, 1898.

5. George Philip, b. 21 Nov. 1869.

1. Eleanor Mary, a nun, d. 18 Aug. 1903.

2. Isabella Theresa.

3. Cecilia Jane, d. in infancy.

Seat Rye Hill, Athenry, co. Galway.

Pedigree of the More O’Ferralls

Descended from two great Catholic Irish families, the More O’Ferrals combined with the marriage in 1751 of the Balyna heiress Letitia O’More and the Dublin banker Richard Ferrall. At the close of the 18th century, Richard and Letitia’s sons played a prominent role on the battlefields of Europe. During the 1840s, Sir Richard More O’Ferrall emerged as one of the great champions of religious toleration and independence. Latter members of the family include the police commissioner John, the film director George, the horse trainer Roderic, the de Beers marketing guru Rory and the unfortunate Richard, murdered by the IRA in 1935. Kildangan is now the property of Sheikh Maktoum whilst Balyna is an exclusive hotel.

The More O Ferralls descend from the House of Mordha (Moore or More) who populated the Irish midlands in the early Christian period. During the mid 16th century, English Adventurers seized the family lands in Co. Laois as part of the first plantation of Ireland. Rory Og O’More spearheaded a rebellion against the Dublin government of Queen Elizabeth in the 1560s and 1570s. The insurrection was unique for the age in that it involved a coalition of Irish clans, headed up by the O’More and O’Byrnes. On New Year’s Eve 1577, the government invited the O’Mores to a peace conference in the ancient rath of Mullaghmast near Ballitore, Co. Kildare. Shortly after the forty O’More delegates arrival, the English opened fire with their muskets and killed them all. The brutality of the Mullaghmast massacre stunned the native Irish. Rory Og, who had sagely avoided the conference, rapidly launched a major campaign against the colonists but was hunted down and executed three months later. In an attempt to quell the ongoing violence, Queen Elizabeth subsequently granted an estate at Balyna, Moyvalley, Co. Kildare, to Rory’s younger son, Calaogh (or Charles) O’More. Balyna was to be the home of the O More chieftains and their descendants for the next 400 years.

In October 1641 Rory O More, a cousin of Calaogh, joined forces with Conor Maguire, Baron of Enniskillen, in a plot to seize Dublin Castle. Betrayed by Owen O’Connelly, Rory just managed to escape but the others were executed. Rory was hiding in the thick woods of Balyna when a small force of English soldiers surprised him. He plunged his walking stick into the earth and made for the hills.[1] The stick took root and evolved into a conifer. Family legend had it that when the tree died, the O’More family would leave Balyna. In 1957 the tree, a Scots Pine, died and fell in a storm. Balyna passed from the More O Ferrall family shortly afterwards.

Amongst those who fought with Rory O’More in his subsequent war against Cromwell were his cousins Roger and Lewis, sons of Calaogh O’Moore by his wife Margaret Scurlock.[2]. Colonel Roger O’Moore married Jane Barnewall, daughter of the Catholic hero Sir Patrick Barnewall of Turvey.[3] His brother Colonel Lewis O’Moore married Mary, daughter of Philip MacHugh O’Reilly. Two sons became priests while the third, Anthony, succeeded to Balyna and married Anne Hope, daughter of Alexander Hope of Mullingar.

Anne O’More gave Anthony two sons Roger II (d. 1746) and Lewis II (1674 – 1737) and a daughter Mary who married Captain Conor O’Reilly. The family was much involved with Spain during the early 18th century, presumably through their continuing adherence to Roman Catholicism. Roger II’s eldest son Anthony became a General in the Spanish service. Lewis II’s daughter Mary was Maid of Honour to Queen Isabella Farnese of Spain. Their cousin, another Mary, married Tirogh O’Neill and died in Madrid.

Lewis II succeeded to Balyna and married Alicia, a daughter of Con O’Neill. He died on 15th February 1737 and was succeeded by his only son James, the last in the male line of the O’Moores of Balyna. In 1731, James married Mary, daughter of Ambrose Madden of Derryhoran, Co. Galway. Upon James’s death in the winter of 1779, Balyna passed to his only surviving child, Letitia O’Moore. In April 1751, the teenaged Letitia had married 22-year-old banker Richard Ferrall (1729 – 1790).[4]

The Ferralls claim descent from Ir, the second son of Milesius of Spain who came to Ireland in the 4th century BC. In the early 18th century, Richard O’Ferrall, a Dublin brewer, married Catherine Ambrose, daughter of William Ambrose, also a wealthy Dublin brewer. In 1728, Richard’s son Ambrose O’Ferrall married Anne Dillon, daughter of Theobald Dillon, founder of Dillon’s bank, the only Catholic bank in Ireland at this time. In 1748, the above-mentioned Richard Farrell [sic] joined his brother-in-law Thomas in Dillon’s Bank in 1748 to form “Thomas Dillon, Richard Farrell & Company”. Three years earlier, a failed rebellion in Scotland spear-headed by Bonnie Prince Charlie, was still causing havoc with the Irish economy, resulting in a serious increase and over-circulation of paper money. In 1754 three prominent Irish banks fell – Dillon & Farrell was the first to fall. The partners absconded to France where Thomas Dillon died in 1764. Richard returned to Ireland some years later and, in 1779, he moved to his wife’s childhood home at Balyna.

Richard and Letitia had three sons, Ambrose, James and Charles, and six daughters. The girls married into relatively affluent gentry families from Cavan and Longford such as Nugent, Palles, Bolger and Taylor. The three sons all sought military careers on the continent.

The eldest son Major Ambrose O’Ferrall (1752 – 1835) was educated at Dublin’s Fagan’s Academy before going to the Jesuit College in Bruges. In 1770 he entered the Military Academy in Turin, where he was taught to ride by the famous Chevalier Capitolo. The Academy was founded by King Carlo Emmanuelle II of Sardinia in 1739 and is regarded as the cradle of Italy’s military traditions. He subsequently served with the Royal Sardinian army prior to becoming a Cornet in the Duke of Savoy’s Dragoons in 1772. He remained in the service for 18 years, rising to the rank of Major, but returned to manage the family estate in Ireland on learning of his father’s death in March 1790. In 1815 he commissioned the construction of a new big house at Balyna, which remained the family headquarters until its destruction by fire in 1878.

The middle brother Major General James O’Ferrall (1753 – 1828) entered the Austrian Service in 1773 and served in the Revolutionary Wars in Turkey and Italy. From 1792 to 1814 the French Revolutionary armies completely overran the German states, occupying Munich and securing Bavaria as an absolute vassal of the French. James served for the Austrian army against the French but was wounded and taken prisoner at Landsberg in Bavaria on 11th October 1805. After his release he served as Chamberlain to the Emperor Franz I of Austria. He later returned to Ireland and settled at Balliane House, County Wexford. The house was left to him by a distant cousin, Miss Susanna Ambrose, a celebrated beauty known as “the dangerous papist”. In order to inherit, he was obliged to take the name and arms of Ambrose. He died unmarried in 1828.

The youngest brother Adjutant General Charles O’Ferrall (1768 – 1831) was educated at the Jesuit College in Liege. In 1791, the 23-year-old Kildare man became a soldier in the Piedmontese army of the King of Sardinia. When the Sardinian monarchy was overthrown by Napoleon in 1798, Charles relocated to northern Italy where he seems to have operated on a rather more mercenary basis. In August 1799 he commanded a cavalry unit during the Austro-Russians shock defeat of Napoleon’s army at the battle of Novi Liguri. He was subsequently made 1st Equerry, gentleman of the bedchamber, major-general of cavalry and adjutant-general. Charles was evidently very close to the Italian Royal family for when his wife, Margaret Whyte of Leixlip, gave him a son in 1812, the child was named for his godfather, King Victor Emmanuel I. He retired to Ireland where he died at his brother’s Wexford house, Balliane, in 1831. His son Victor returned to Ireland to manage the Balliane estate but ultimately his mismanagement was so chronic the property had to be sold. Victor Emmanuel More O’Ferrall emigrated to America and died alone and unmarried in Albany in September 1864.

Major Ambrose O’Ferrall married twice and had ten children. In 1796 he took as his first wife Mary Anne, only child of John Bagot, patriarch of another prominent Catholic family based at Castle Bagot, Co. Dublin. She gave him five sons and five daughters before her death in the winter of 1810. [5] The sons were educated at Downside and Stoneyhurst with the exception of the fourth, Robert , who was ordained a priest in 1832 but died of cholera two years later, and Charles, the youngest, who went to Clongowes Wood and founded the Kildangan branch. One daughter, Letitia, a nun in the Sisters of Charity, gave £3,000 for the purchase of a house in St Stephen’s Green, Dublin, which grew to be one of Dublin’s largest hospitals, St Vincent’s. She later transferred to the Order of Saint Francis de Sales and died in Brussels in 1859.[6]

Major O’Ferrall was succeeded at Balyna by his firstborn son, the Right Hon. Richard More O’Ferrall, MP, DL, JP. Born on 10th April 1797 and educated at Downside and Stonyhurst, Richard was elected MP for Co. Kildare in 1830, a seat he retained until 1847 when appointed Governor of Malta. When a Royal Commission was issued in 1833 to investigate the condition of the poor in Ireland, Richard and the Archbishop of Dublin were its two Catholic members. He was an adviser to the Catholic University, a friend of Cardinal Wiseman and a supporter of Daniel O Connell. In 1835, under the administration of Lord Melbourne, he became Lord of the Treasury, First Secretary of the Admiralty and, in 1841, Secretary to the Treasury. In 1847 he was the first civilian to hold the post of Governor of Malta. As such he helped develop the island into one of Britain’s most important strategic naval bases. He also secured the passing of a new Constitution for Malta in 1849, which effectively allowed for Maltese home rule. In 1851 he resigned in protest against the Prime Minister, Lord John Russell, who had spoken out against a papal bill seeking to restore a Catholic hierarchy in England. In 1856 he won the parliamentary seat of Co. Longford which he held until 1865. In September 1839 he married Matilda (d. 1882), daughter and co-heir of the 3rd Viscount Southwell. They had a son, Ambrose, and a daughter, Maria who married the Crimean War hero Sir Walter Nugent, 2nd Baronet, of Donore, Co. Westmeath.[7]

In 1878, the house at Balyna was badly burned in a fire. Richard died in Dun Laoghaire (Kingstown) in October 1880 and was succeeded by his 34-year-old son Ambrose More O’Ferrall, DL, JP, High Sheriff of Counties Kildare (1876) and Carlow (1887). In October 1872 Ambrose married Jessie Gordon-Canning, daughter of Patrick Robert Gordon-Canning of Hartpury Hall in Gloucestershire.[8] Shortly after his inheritance of Balyna, he recruited the ecclesiastical architect WH Byrne to design a new Italianate style house at Balyna. Ambrose died in April 1911 leaving two daughters – Mabel who married Major Edmund Dease, MP, of Rath House, Ballybrittas, Queen’s County and Alice who married Alexander Lattin Mansfield of the Morristown Lattin family (qv).

As such the Balyna estate passed to Ambrose’s cousin Edward More O’Ferrall. Born in 1846, Edward was the son of Major Ambrose O’Farrell’s second son, John Lewis More O Ferrall who had been appointed Commissioner of the Dublin Metropolitan Police on its establishment in 1871. Edward’s mother Clare was a daughter of Thomas Segrave of Cabra.[9] John and Clare lived between Granite Hall in Kingstown, Co. Dublin and Lisard in Co. Longford. Edward was a magistrate of some influence in Longford but his ownership of Balyna was short-lived as he died three years after the inheritance. Balyna duly passed to his eldest son John by his wife Juliana, daughter of Henry Lambert, MP, of Carnagh, Co. Wexford.

John More O’Ferrall was born in February 1872, the eldest of six sons and two daughters.[10] His brother Dr. Lewis More O’Ferrall had a distinguished career in World War One and was father to the film and theatre director George More O’Ferrall. George’s only son Rory is presently Director of Public and Corporate Affairs for the De Beers Group in London. Another brother Gerald More O’Ferrall inherited Lisard and married Geraldine Fitzgerald, granddaughter of the 4th Duke of Leinster (qv). Like so many of his forbears, John evidently had a flair for all things Mediterranean and, in October 1901, he married an Italian girl Cesira Maria, daughter of David Polenghi of Milan. By this marriage he had two sons, Gerald and Charles, and five daughters.[11]

Upon John’s death in October 1925, his 21-year-old son Gerald Rory More O’Ferrall (1904 – 1976) succeeded to Balyna. Gerald was educated at Clongowes Wood and, on 7th January 1930, married Maureen, daughter of Denis Kennedy, FRCSI, of Hollywood, Carrickmines, Co. Dublin.[12] They had five sons and two daughters who in turn had some 26 children.

Balyna was sold in 1960 and was owned by Bewley’s Oriental Cafes Ltd until 1983.

FOOTNOTES

[1] Rory went on to become one of the principal leaders of the Confederate Army in Ireland, rallying both Gaelic Irish and Old English under his banner, assuring them his ambition was to defend the King and preserve Catholicism. His initial campaigning resulted in victory over the English at Julianstown, Co. Meath. As the war ran on, the Confederation collapsed. Rory was last heard of in 1652 escaping from Boffin Island, Co. Galway, disguised as a fisherman.

[2] Their cousin Colonel Charles O’More commanded a troop of horse in Owen Roe O Neill’s army. In 1688 Colonel O’More raised a regiment of foot in which all barring two of its members were natives of the Queen’s County. All the officers, except these two, were killed at the battle of Aughrim on Sunday 12 July 1691.He died in 1601, leaving a daughter Margaret who married Thomas Plunkett of Clonebraney.

[3] Roger’s only son Charles was a Colonel in the Jacobite army but was killed at Aughrim on 12th July 1691. Of his four daughters, Eleanor married Daniel McMurrough Kavanagh, Mary married Tirogh O’Neill and died in Madrid, Elizabeth married Christopher Bealing and died in 1729 in her 100th year and Anne married Patrick Sarsfield of Lucan and was mother to the famous Patrick Sarsfield, Earl of Lucan.

[4] Richard’s younger sister Catherine married George Lattin of Morristown (qv).

[5] In 1811 the Major married secondly Margaret Dunne (d. 30 July 1830), youngest daughter of Francis Dunne of Brittas, Co. Laois.

[6] St. Vincent’s has since been relocated to Donnybrook. The More O’Ferralls are also credited with introducing the Sisters of Bon Secours to Ireland in 1861 with the establishment of a community on Dublin’s Grenville Street. Today, Bon Secours is the largest private healthcare provider in Ireland.

[7] Maria’s son Sir Walter Nugent, 4th Bart, was sometime Senator of the Irish Free State and President of the Dublin Chamber of Commerce.

[8] Jessie died in April 1934.

[9] Edward’s sister Ellen married, as his second wife, Charles Owen O’Conor, PC, MP, the O’Conor Don of Clonalis House, Co. Roscommon.

[10] John’s younger sister Ellen married Charles Hugh O’Connor, KM, President of the Irish Branch of the Knights of Rhodes and Malta, and was mother to the Rev. Charles Denis O’Conor, the O’Conor Don.

[11] The second son, Charles, married a Scottish girl, Ivy Officer and settled in the Cape Province of South Africa where, I believe, he still has descendents living.

[12] Maureen died on 11th December 1971

FROM ‘THE LANDED GENTRY & ARISTOCRACY OF CO. KILDARE’ BY TURTLE BUNBURY & ART KAVANAGH (IRISH FAMILY NAMES, 2004).

O’FERRALL OF BALYNA – BLG 1871

O’FERRALL OF BALYNA

More-O’Ferrall.  The Right Hon Richard of Balyna, co Kildare. PC. JP. and DL.           b 1797 m 28 Sept 1839 Hon Matilda Southwell 3rd dau of Anthony 3rd Viscount Southwell KP and has

1.Ambrose Richard

2.Maria Anne m. 1860 to Walter George Nugent Esq eldest son of Sir Percy Nugent, Bart. of Donore.

Mr More O’Ferrall, formerly MP successively for co Kildare and Longford was appointed a Lord of the Treasury 1835, Secretary to the Admiralty 1839, and Secretary to the Treasury 1841. From 1847 to 1851 he held the office of Governor of Malta

Lineage.

Gen1

Anthony O’More chief of his name, Lord of Leix, had a son and two daughters:

  1. Melaghlan O’More d. 1481, m. Catherine daughter. of Conn O’Neill of Tyrone
  2. the elder Dorothy, wife of Thomas Fitzgerald, 7th Earl of Kildare
  3. the younger, m. to Brian Fitzpatrick of Castlebar

gen 2

Melaghlan O’More d. 1481 leaving a son:

Gen3

  1. Connell O’More  m. a dau of Charles O’Dempsey, d. 1518 and left three sons, and one dau

Gen 4

  1. AN other
  2. Roger O’More, Caoch, Lord of Leix. The 2nd son Roger O’More, Caoch, Lord of Leix was slain by his brother Philip 1556. He m. Margaret, daughter and heir of Thomas Butler, 3rd son of Pierce, 8th Earl of Ormonde, and had issue.
  3. Philip
  4. Ellen m. Sir Oliver Grace, Baron of Courtstown.

The 2nd son Roger O’More, Caoch, Lord of Leix was slain by his brother Philip 1556. He m.Margaret, dau. and heir of Thomas Butler, 3rd son of Pierce, 8th Earl of Ormonde, and had issue.

Gen 5

  1. Rory, slain 1578, he had a dau. Honora, wife of John Morres, Esq, co. Tipperary.
  2. Charles of Balyna, (Kedagh,) page to Queen Elizabeth, who gave him Balyna as a new year’s gift. He m. the dau. of Sir Maurice Fitzgerald, Knt of Luagh, co. Kildare
  3. Lewis, whose son

Gen6

Walter, m. Alicia Elliott, and had a son,

Gen 7

  1. Patrick, m.  Joan, dau. of O’Hely, of co. Limerick, father of

Gen 8

  1. Edmund Moore esq, m. Elizabeth, daughter .of Maurice Graham esq , and had, with seven daughters, one son,

Gen 9

  1. James Moore, esq. of Dublin m. Mary, dau. of James Cullen esq, and widow of col. Keating, and d. 2 june 1741, leaving three sons

Gen 10

  1. Roger, who d.s.p.; (decessit sine prole)
  2. Edward, of whom presently;
  3. James, col of a regt in the French service, and afterwards Lieut-Col in the British army, who d. at Fontainbleau, 1813.

The 2nd son, Edward Moore esq of Mount Browne, co. Dublin, m. Jane Reynolds , of Dublin, and dying about the year 1787, left with three daus.,

Gen 11

  1. Jane, wife of Owen O’Conor, esq of Belanagare;
  2. Maria, wife of Valentine O’Connor, esq of Dublin; and
  3. Judith, wife of Patrick Grehan, esq of Dublin

an only son, James Moore esq of Mount Browne, who m. Anne, dau of Denis Byrne esq of co Wicklow, and dying about 1785, left issue

Gen 12

  1. Edward Moore esq of Seamore Place , Mayfair;
  2. Walter Moore esq of Liverpool d. unm.; and
  3. Anne widow of William Jermingham esq, brother of Lord Stafford.

The 2nd son

Charles O’More of Balyna d 1601, leaving (by Margaret Scurloch his wife) two sons and a dau., viz

  1. Roger, col confederated Catholics 1646, m Jane, dau. of  Sir Patrick Barnewall, Knt of Turvey, and had issue
  1. Charles, col in the army, killed at Aughrim 12 july 1691, s.p.
  2. Anne, wife of Patrick Sarsfield, of Lucan, and mother of Patrick, Earl of Lucan.
  3. Eleanor, wife of Daniel, son of Sir Hugh Morogh Kavanagh, Knt.
  4. Mary, wife of Tirlogh O’Neill.
  5. Elizabeth, wife of Christopher Beeling
  1. Lewis, of whose line we treat.
  2. Margaret, m. to Thomas Plunkett, esq of Clonebreney.

The 2nd son,

Col Lewis More, one of the confederated catholics in 1646, m. mary, dau of Philip-Mac Hugh O’Reilly, and was father of Anthony More esq of Balyna who m Anne, dau of Alexander Hope esq of Molingar, and had (with a dau Mary, wife of Capt Conor O’Reilly) two sons,

  1. Lewis his heir,
  2. Roger, whose will (dated 1 march 1746) was proved 9 jan 1748. He m. Ellinor, dau of William Wright esq, and has issue,
  1. Anthony O’More, gen in the Spanish service;
  2. May, wife of Robert Daly esq of Caulfield; and
  3. Mary, wife of Packington Edgeworth, esq of Longwood.

The elder son,

Lewis More, esq of Balyna, m Alicia, dau of Con O’Neill esq, and had with a dau,

  1. Mary, maid of honour to the Queen of Spain, m to –Ward esq of Madrid) a son and heir,
  2. James More esq of Balyna, whose will bears date 13 dec 1778; by Mary his wife, dau of Ambrose Madden esq of Derryhoran, he left an only dau, and heir,

Letitia More who m Richard O’Ferrall esq, only son of Ambrose O’Ferrall esq, by jane Dillion his wife, and dying 1778 (her husband survived till 1790) left several daus, viz,

  1. Mrs Boulger,
  2. Mrs Morris,
  3. Mrs Taylor,
  4. Mrs Pallas of Grouse Hall co Cavan, and
  5. Mrs Nugent of Killasons, co Longford)

And three sons, viz,

  1. Ambrose, his heir,
  2. James, maj-gen in the Austrian service, d 1828 aged 75,
  3. Charles, col in the Sardinian service, d 1831.

The eldest son

Ambrose O’Ferrall esq of Balyna, m 1796, Anne, only child of John Bagot esq of Castle Bagot, co Dublin, by Anne, his 1st wife, only dau, and heiress of W.Walsh esq of Kilmurry, co Meath, by Elizabeth Nangle, his wife, and by her (who d 1810) had issue,

  1. Richard More (Right Hon) now of Balyna House,
  2. John Lewis More, of Lissard, co Longford, J.P. and D.L., barrister-at-law, Commissioner of Metropolitan Police, Dublin, m 1836, Clare, dau of Thomas Segrave esq, a younger son of the Cabra family, and has a son, and three daus
  1. Edward Gerald
  2. Mary,
  3. Mia, and
  4. Ellen.
  1. James More
  2. Robert More, in holy orders, d 1834
  3. Edward More, of Kildangan, co Kildare, High Sheriff co Kildare 1856-7, m 1849, Susan, only child of Dominick O’Reilly esq of Kildangan Castle, co Kildare, and by her (who d 1855) has an only son Dominick, b 1855.
  4. Mary-Ann
  5. Letitie, a nun
  6. Louisa
  7. Catherine
  8. Rose-Anna, m Thomas Errington, esq of Clints, co York

Mr O’Ferrall m 2ndly, 1811, Margaret, youngest dau of the late F.Dunne esq of Brittas, Queen’s county, which lady d 1826. He d 1835, aged 83.

BLG 1871: http://tinyurl.com/oagryqp

Roche of Limerick

Extract from Burke’s History of Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland Vol 1

Published in London   MDCCCXXXIII (1833) {pp 669 – 671}

The family of Roche or Limerick has branched from that of Castletown-Roche, in the county of Cork. John Roche, of Castletown-Roche, descended from the Viscounts Fermoy, was a member of the Catholic Parliament or Council held at Kilkenny during the civil wars, and his name appears as such to the declaration of the Irish Roman Catholics in 1641.

His eldest son, Robert Roche, espoused Juliana 0’Moore, daughter of Alexander O’Moore, of Ballina, in the county of Kildare, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Stephen Roche, known by the designation of Dov, or Black, from his complexion,  whose estate, already injured by composition in the time of Cromwell, was entirely forfeited under William III.

Compelled in consequence to leave the county of Cork, he retired to Kilrush, in Clare, and afterwards took up his abode at Pallas, in the county of Limerick, in the vicinity of his brother-in-law, William Apjohn, esq.  He married Anastasia, elder daughter and co-heir of Thomas Lysaght, esq. (the other co-heir, Catherine, was the wife of Mr. Apjohn) and was succeeded by his son.

John Roche, esq. b. in 1688, who wedded Anne, youngest daughter of Philip Stacpole, esq. of Mountcashell (the fee of which estate is now in Thomas Roche, esq.) Kilneen, and Kilcoman, in the county of Clare, (by his wife, Christian, daughter of John Creagh, of Ballyvolane, in the same shire, colonel in the Irish army, anno 1642), and had, with other issue,

  1. Philip, m. Margaret, daughter of John Kelly, esq. of Limerick, and had issue
  2. John, who m. Miss Harold, cousin of General Harold, of the Saxon service, and had a daughter, Mary-Anne, who wedded John Meade, esq. of Limerick, and was mother of Captain Roche Meade, of the 21st regiment, deputy-adjutant-general.
  3. STEPHEN, b. 5th December, 1724 his heir.
    1. John, who m. Miss Whyte, dau. of Charles Whyte, esq. of Leix lip, and had a son,
        1. PHILIP, m. to the Hon. Anna Maria Plunket, daughter of Randall, thirteenth Lord Dunsany, and by her (who wedded, secondly, Captain Ryder Burton, R.N.) had one son, John, and two daughters; the younger of whom, Anna-Maria, m. in 1830, Thomas, present Lord Louth
        2. Charles, who m. his cousin, Miss Whyte, and has issue.
          • Ellen, m. to Peter Daly, esq. of Cloncagh, in the county of Galway.
          • Mary, m. to George Ryan, esq. of Inch, in the county of Tipperary.
          • Margaret, m. to Standish Barry, esq. of Lemlara, in the county of Cork, and is mother of Garret Standish Barry, esq. now M.P. for that shire
  4. Jane, m. to John Sheehy, esq. of Cork, and had a daughter, m. to Bryan Keating, esq. by whom she was mother of General Keating.
  5. Christiana, m. to James Lombard, esq. of the county of Cork, and had several daughters; of whom the youngest m. Daniel O’Connell, esq. of Ivragh, in the county of Kerry, and was mother of Charles O’Connell, esq. now M.P. for that shire. The eldest m. Daniel Cronin, esq. of the Park, in the county of Kerry.

The eldest son, STEPHEN ROCHE, esq. b. 5th December, 1724, succeeded his father in 1760. He m. first, Margaret, daughter of Richard Meade, esq. and had issue,

  1. JOHN, his successor.
  2. Richard, in holy orders, who cl. in 1805.
  3. George, successor to his brother, John.
  4. Anne, m. to Peter Long, esq. of Waterford, and had, with other children, a daughter, Margaret Long, who wedded first, James O’Brien, esq. of Limerick, and secondly Cornelius O’Brien, esq. M.P. for Clare; by the former of whom she had three sons,
  • John O’Brien, esq. of Elmville, in the county of Clare. who espoused Ellen, daughter of Jeremiah Murphy. esq. of Hyde Park, in Corkshire, and niece of the Right Rev. Doctor Murphy .
  • Peter O’Brien, esq. of Limerick, who m. Miss Shiel, sister of Richard L. Shiel, esq. M.P. for the county of Tipperary.
  • James O’Brien, esq. barrister-at-law.

 

5.Mary , m. to Peter Grehan,(b 1749) esq. of Dublin, and had issue,

  1. Thady Grehan, married and has issue.
  2. Stephen Grehan, who m. Miss Ryan, of Inch. and has issue.
  3. Margaret, (widow of John Joyce. esq.) a nun at Galway.
  4. Anne Grehan, m. to Thomas Segrave, esq. of the family of Cabra, and had, with other issue, two daughters,
  • Mary Segrave,m. to Nicholas Whyte, esq. late high sheriff of Downshire.
  • Anne-Frances Segrave, m. in 1826, to the Hon. William Browne, brother of the Earl of Kenmare.
  1. Mary Grehan, m. to Hubert Dolphin, esq. of the county of Galway, and has issue.
  2. Helen Grehan, m. to Alexander Sherlock, esq. of Killespie, in the county of Waterford, and has issue.
  3. Lucy Grehan, m. to Christopher Gallwey, esq. of Killarney, and has issue.

Stephen Roche espoused secondly, Sarah, daughter and co-heiress of John O’Bryen. esq. of Moyvanine and Clounties, both in the county of Limerick, chief of the O’Bryens, of Arran, lineal descendants of Brien Borroimhe, and had issue,

  1. STEPHEN, of Killarney, now in possession of the ancient estates of Moyvanine and Clounties, m. Maria, daughter of John Moylan, esq. of Cork, and has issue,
  1. STEPHEN, m. Eleanor, eldest daughter and co-heiress of the late Thomas Reddington  esq. of Rye Hill, in the county of Galway.
  2. John.
  3. Mary, a nun
  4. Sarah, m. to John Howley  esq. assistant barrister for the King’s County
  5. Anne – unmarried
  6. Helena – unmarried
  7. Harriet, m. to Daniel Cronin, esq, late high sheriff for Kerry.
  1. Thomas, of Limerick, m. Hellen, daughter of John Ankettle, esq. and has issue,
  1. 1 Stephen, who married Catherine, daughter, and co-heiress of— Knight, esq. by Miss Lacy, his wife, cousin of the celebrated Marshal Count Lacy, the favourite and friend of the Emperor JOSEPH II. who died in his arms (1792).
  2. 2 John, unmarried.
  3. 3 William, a solicitor in Dublin, married Eliza, another daughter and co heir of— Knight, esq.
  4. 4 Helen, m. to D. R. Kane, esq. barrister-at-law, commissioner of bankruptcy, in Ireland.
  5. 5 Sarah unmarried.
  1. James, of Cork, m. Anne, daughter of John Moylan, esq. (sister of his brother’s wife, both nearly allied to the late Right Rev. Doctor Moylan, of Cork) by whom (now deceased) he has two daughters, Marianne and Sarah.
  1. WILLIAM, M.P. for his native city of Limerick, and its first catholic representative, since the repeal of the penal laws. Mr. Roche was an eminent banker, and his free and entirely unsought for election is the strongest attestation of homage that his fellow citizens could have paid to public virtue, and private worth. He resides in Limerick, and his gardens there, unique in design and construction, have long attracted the attention of travellers. (See Fitzgerald’s History of Limerick.) } unmarried. 
  1. Sarah, m. to Francis French, esq . of Portcarran, in the county of Galway, who (I. a. p.
  1. Hellen, m. to the late Denis O’ Meagher, esq. of Kilmoyler, in the county of Tipperary, and left at her decease,
  1. Stephen O’Meagher, esq. the present chief of that ancient family.
  2. William O’Meagher, student-at law.
  3. Sarah O’Meagher.
  4. Maria O’Meagher.

VII. Anastasia, relict of Edward 0’ Meagher, esq. of Marl Hill, in the county of Tipperary.

Stephen Roche (his second wife having died on the 8th November, 1786,) married thirdly, Mary-Anne, daughter and co-heir of Richard Ankettle, M.D.by his wife, Mary Bourchier, of the family of the Bourchiers, Lords Berners; but by this lady, who died in December, 1821, he had no children. He died. 12th February, 1804, and was succeeded by his eldest son,

John Roche, esq. one of the most eminent merchants in Dublin, who married Mary, daughter of Thady Grehan, esq. of that city but dying without issue in September, 1825, was succeeded by his brother, the present George Roche, esq. of Granagh Castle, in the county of Kilkenny, now the Chief of his house.

Arms –Gules, three roaches naiant in pale.

Crest —A rock ppr. thereon a fish eagle with its wings displayed, arg. membered, or. in the claw a roach.

Motto —Mon Dieu est ma roche.

Estates~—In the counties of Kilkenny, Limerick, and Clare.

Seat—Granagh Castle, Kilkennyshire. 

‘ In the year 1724-, this Doctor Ankettle was a student of medicine at Paris, when John Fitzgibbon, father of the Lord Chancellor Fitzgibbon, Earl of Clare, visited that capital to pursue a course, not of divinity, as Sir Jonah Harrington states, but of medicine. Young Fitzgibbon immediately sought his townsman, who was allowed a day to show Paris to his friend, and both traversed the city accordingly in all directions. At length they stopped at a late hour to visit the cathedral of Notre Dame, in the immediate vicinity of their college; and exhausted with fatigue, fell so soundly asleep on the benches of the choir, as to escape the sexton’s closing the church at night, It was past midnight when the youths awoke, and finding themselves thus immured, touched in their groping about the bell-rope, and soon made the great chimes resound to the no small amazement of the worthy sexton; and alarm of the good citizens of Paris. They were, of course, quietly liberated . John Fitzgibbon subsequently relinquished his medical studies, and was called to the Irish bar in 1732, when he successfully laid the foundation of his prosperous house.

GENERAL VALLANCEY, in his Collectanea. vol. i. page 569, makes specific mention of this John O’Bryen, whom he describes as the representative of the princely branch of the O’Bryens. of Arran, and gives a transcript of a certificate from the mayor and bailiffs of the town of Galway, attesting the loyalty of Morrogh O’Bryen, (the sixth progenitor of the said John) chief of the Mc’Tiges, of Arran,temporal lords of the isles of Arran, time out of man’s memory, (the original of this document is in the possession of James Roche, esq. of Cork; special allusion is made to it in O’Brien’s Irish Dictionary , and likewise in Ferrar‘s History of Limerick, where the family of Roche is also referred to. The certificate bears date, 30th March, 1588, and is addressed to Queen Elizabeth. Lady Morgan founds her story of ” ‘The O’BRIENs and the O’FLAHERTYS,” on some circumstances recited in this document relative  to the dissensions of these powerful septa.

Of the same stock as the noble house of Clan willism. This Margaret was great-grand-niece of General Purcell, who was executed by order of Ireton, after the capitulation of Limerick in 1651.

Roche Of Aghado (sic) – BLG 1847

Roche Of Aghado

Roche, James Joseph Esq of Aghado House, co Cork b. 12 May, 1794 m in Nov 1821 Catharine youngest dau of the late Daniel Callaghan Esq of Lotabeg in the same county and has issue

  1. Maria Josepha
  2. Emily

Mr Roche, a magistrate for the co. Cork s. his uncle, the late John Roche Esq in March 1829. He and his brother Hugh, an officer in the navy, are sons of Hugh Roche, Esq by Anne, his wife dau. of Daniel McCarthy Esq, a Spanish merchant son of John  McCarthy Esq.  Seat. Aghado House co. Cork.

http://tinyurl.com/q6yfyrl

BLG 1847 p.1133

More-O’Ferral lineage BLG 1871

O’Ferral of Balyna

More-O’Ferrall The Right Hon. Richard, of Balyna, co. Kildare, ,P.C,J.P. and D.L b. 1797; m.28 sept 1839, Hon Matilda Southwell, 3rd dau. Of Anthony, 3rd Viscount Southwell, K.P, and has,

  1. Ambrose- Richard
  2. Maria-Anne m. 1860 to Walter-George Nugent esq, eldest son of Sir Percy Nugent Bart of Domore.

Mr More-O’Farrell formerly M.P successively for cos. Kildare and Longford was appointed a lord of the treasury 1835, secretary to the Admiralty 1839, and secretary to the treasury 1841. From 1847 to 1851 he held the office of Governor of Malta.

Lineage.

Anthony O’More chief of his name, Lord of Leix, had (with two daus, the elder Dorothy, wife of Thomas Fitzgerald, 7th Earl of Kildare, and the younger, m. to Brian Fitzpatrick of Castlebar) a son.

Melaghlan O’More who d. 1481 leaving (by Catherine his wife dau. of Conn O’Neill of Tyrone) a son

Connell O’More who m. a dau of Charles O’Dempsey, and left (at his decease) 1518, three sons, and one dau Ellen,( wife of Sir Oliver Grace, Baron of Courtstown.)

The 2nd son Roger O’More, Caoch, Lord of Leix was slain by his brother Philip 1556. He m.Margaret, dau. and heir of Thomas Butler, 3rd son of Pierce, 8th Earl of Ormonde, and had issue.

  1. Rory, slain 1578, he had a dau. Honora, wife of John Morres, Esq, co. Tipperary.
  2. Charles of Balyna,

Kedagh, page to Queen Elizabeth, who gave him Balyna as a new year’s gift. He m. the dau. of Sir Maurice Fitzgerald, Knt of Luagh, co. Kildare

  1. Lewis, whose son Walter, m. Alicia Elliott, and had a son,
  1. Patrick, father of (by Joan, his wife, dau. of O’Hely, of co. limerick)
  1. Edmund Moore esq., who (m. Elizabeth, dau.of Maurice Graham esq)., and had (with seven daus.) one son,
  1. James Moore, esq. of Dublin who d. 2 june 1741, leaving (by Mary his wife, dau. of James Cullen esq, and widow of col. Keating) three sons
  1. Roger, who d.s.p.; (decessit sine prole)
  2. Edward, of whom presently;
  3. James, col of a regt in the French service, and afterwards Lieut-Col in the British army, who d. at Fontainbleau, 1813.

The 2nd son, Edward Moore esq of Mount Browne, co. Dublin, m. Jane Reynolds , of Dublin, and dying about the year 1787, left with three daus.,

  1. Jane, wife of Owen O’Conor, esq of Belanagare;
  2. Maria, wife of Valentine O’Connor, esq of Dublin; and
  3. Judith, wife of Patrick Grehan, esq of Dublin

an only son, James Moore esq of Mount Browne, who m. Anne, dau of Denis Byrne esq of co Wicklow, and dying about 1785, left issue

  1. Edward Moore esq of Seamore Place , Mayfair;
  2. Walter Moore esq of Liverpool d. unm.; and
  3. Anne widow of William Jermingham esq, brother of Lord Stafford.

The 2nd son

Charles O’More of Balyna d 1601, leaving (by Margaret Scurloch his wife) two sons and a dau., viz

  1. Roger, col confederated Catholics 1646, m Jane, dau. of  Sir Patrick Barnewall, Knt of Turvey, and had issue
  1. Charles, col in the army, killed at Aughrim 12 july 1691, s.p.
  2. Anne, wife of Patrick Sarsfield, of Lucan, and mother of Patrick, Earl of Lucan.
  3. Eleanor, wife of Daniel, son of Sir Hugh Morogh Kavanagh, Knt.
  4. Mary, wife of Tirlogh O’Neill.
  5. Elizabeth, wife of Christopher Beeling
  1. Lewis, of whose line we treat.
  2. Margaret, m. to Thomas Plunkett, esq of Clonebreney.

The 2nd son,

Col Lewis More, one of the confederated catholics in 1646, m. mary, dau of Philip-Mac Hugh O’Reilly, and was father of Anthony More esq of Balyna who m Anne, dau of Alexander Hope esq of Molingar, and had (with a dau Mary, wife of Capt conor O’Reilly) two sons,

  1. Lewis his heir,
  2. Roger, whose will (dated 1 march 1746) was proved 9 jan 1748. He m. ellinor, dau of william wright esq, and has issue,
  1. Anthony o’more, gen in the Spanish service;
  2. May wife of Robert daly esq of Caulfield; and
  3. Mary, wife of Packington Edgeworth, esq of Longwood.

The elder son,

Lewis More, esq of Balyna, m Alicia, dau of Con O’Neill esq, and had with a dau,

  1. Mary, maid of honour to the queen of spain, m to –Ward esq of Madrid) a son and heir,
  2. James more esq of Balyna, whose will bears date 13 dec 1778; by Mary his wife, dau of Ambrose Madden esq of derryhoran, he left an only dau, and heir,

Letitia More who m Richard O’Ferrall esq, only son of Ambrose O’Ferrall esq, by jane Dillion his wife, and dying 1778 (her husband survived till 1790) left several daus, viz,

  1. Mrs Boulger,
  2. Mrs Morris,
  3. Mrs taylor,
  4. mrs Pallas of grouse Hall co cavan, and
  5. Mrs Nugent of Killasons, co Longford)

And three sons, viz,

  1. Ambrose, his heir,
  2. James, maj-gen in the Austrian service, d 1828 aged 75,
  3. Charles, col in the Sardinian service, d 1831.

The eldest son

Ambrose O’Ferrall esq of Balyna, m 1796, anne, only child of john Bagot esq of castle Bagot, co Dublin, by Anne, his 1st wife, only dau, and heiress of W.Walsh esq of Kilmurry, co meath, by Elizabeth Nangle, his wife, and by her (who d 1810) had issue,

  1. Richard More (Right Hon) now of Balyna House,
  2. John Lewis More, of Lissard, co Longford, J.P. and D.L., barrister-at-law, Commissioner of Metropolitan Police, Dublin, m 1836, Clare, dau of Thomas Segrave esq, a younger son of the Cabra family, and has a son, and three daus
  1. Edward Gerald
  2. Mary,
  3. Mia, and
  4. Ellen.
  1. James More
  2. Robert More, in holy orders, d 1834
  3. Edward More, of Kildangan, co Kildare high sheriff co Kildare 1856-7, m 1849, Susan, only child of Dominick O’Reilly esq of Kildangan Castle, co Kildare, and by her (who d 1855) has an only son Dominick, b 1855.
  4. Mary-Ann
  5. Letitie, a nun
  6. Louisa
  7. Catherine
  8. Rose-Anna, m Thomas Errington, esq of Clints, co York

Mr O’Ferrall m 2ndly, 1811, Margaret, youngest dau of the late f.Dunne esq of Brittas, Queen’s county, which lady d 1826. He d 1835, aged 83

BLG 1871: http://tinyurl.com/oagryqp