Category Archives: Roper Parkington

Bastille Day Requiem Mass – Westminster Cathedral 1916

the Marchioness Imperiali

The Marchioness Imperiali

frenchflagFRANCE’S DAY : REQUIEM AT THE CATHEDRAL.—France’s Day was celebrated with much rejoicing in London on Friday, and the tricolour was sold in the streets for the benefit of the Red Cross Society of France. For the gallant soldiers of our Ally who have made the supreme sacrifice since the commencement of the war, a Requiem Mass was celebrated in Westminster Cathedral in the presence of the Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster. Representatives of the Allies engaged in the war were present, including M. Paul Cambon, the French Ambassador, and the Embassy Staff, the Italian Ambassador and the Marchioness Imperiali the Russian Ambassador, the Portuguese Minister, and Lieut General Orth, of the Belgian Legation. There were also present the Greek Minister, the Serbian Minister, Mr. and Mrs. Asquith, the Duke of Norfolk, the Mayor of Westminster, the Duke of Somerset, the Speaker of the House of Commons, Lord Edmund Talbot, Sir Peter and Lady McBride, Major-General Sir Francis Lloyd, Sir Roper Parkington, and Lord Claud Hamilton. His Majesty the King, was represented by Lord Sandhurst, and Queen Alexandra by Colonel Sir Henry Streatfeild. The Catholic Women’s League was represented by the president, Mrs.  James Hope, and the hon. organizing secretary, Mrs St. George Saunders. The League also placed a wreath of lillies and laurel before the mosaic of Joan of Arc, with the inscription ” Aux Heros de la France morts pour la Patrie, la Gloire et la Victoire, Hommage de la Ligue des Femmes Catholiques d’Angleterre.” mosaic of joan of arcVarious religious, orders were also represented including the Sisters of Charity, many of whom are engaged in the military hospitals in France.

A catafalque draped with the French colours was erected in front of the high altar, and was provided with a guard of honour of Irish Guards. In the gallery at the western end of the Cathedral were the massed bands of the Brigade of Guards and previous to the commencement of the Mass they played Bizet’s overture ” Patrie,” and later Sullivan’s overture    ” In Memoriam.”

 

westminster-cathedral-1High Mass coram Cardinali was celebrated by Bishop Butt, the assistant priest being Father Edwin Burton, Vice-President of ,St. Edmund’s. The absolutions were pronounced by his Eminence, and the military band gave a splendid rendering of the Dead March in         ” Saul,” preceded by a roll of muffled drums. Then came the “Marseillaise” At the conclusion of the Mass the  “Last Post” sounded by the buglers of the Coldstream Guards followed the National Anthem, and a fitting termination to the impressive service was given by the band playing Gounod’s “Marche Solennelle”.

The above text was found on p.27, 22nd July 1916,  in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

The Annual Dinner of the Benevolent Society for the Relief of the Aged and Infirm Poor. 1904

The Benevolent Society for the Relief of the Aged and Infirm Poor. was the oldest Catholic charity in London  founded in 1761 by Richard Challoner, the Vicar Apostolic of the London District [ the forerunner of the Archbishop of Westminster] between 1758 and 1781. It’s a nice worthy Catholic, and City cause, and it’s nice seeing eight members of the family all there. Having said that, only five were related at the time, another two came from a marriage twenty years later, and the final connection from a marriage fifty two years later.

At least at this one, Lieut.-General Sir William Butler’s speech is rather better than John Roper Parkington’s the following year.

ANNUAL DINNER.

The Annual Dinner in aid of the funds of this excellent charity was held on Monday last, and brought together a large number of the friends and supporters of the society.

Lieut.-General Sir William Butler, K.C.B., presided, and among the company present were the Hon. Charles Russell, Colonel Sir Roper Parkington, Colonel Maguire, Major J. H. White, V.D., Commendatore Hicks, C.C.S.G. ; the Very Revv. Canon Fleming, Canon Keatinge, Canon Murnane, Canon Pycke ; the Very Revv. J. P. Bannin, P.S.M., M. Kelly, O.S.A., D.D., P. J. Murphy, S.M. ; the Revv. Manuel J.Bidwell, D.D., Robert Bracey, 0.P., T. Carey, H. W. Casserly, Alexander Charnley, S.J., W. J. Condon, D. Corkery, G. B. Cox, J. Crowley, E. du Plerny, J. Egan, W. J. Hogan, S. E. Jarvis, I.C., W. Lewis Keatinge, Hugh Kelly, Mark A. Kelly, A. Muller, D.D., J. Musgrave T. F. Norris, J. O’Doherty, M. O’Sullivan, T. J. Ring, P. Riordan, C. A. Shepherd, E. Smith, C. J. Moncrieff Smyth, Francis Stanfield, J. G. Storey, W. 0. Sutcliffe, M.A., J. S. Tasker, E. A. P. Theed, Leo Thomas, S.M., A. E. Whereat, D.D. ; and Messrs. P. M. Albrecht, Frank Beer, Edmund J. Bellord, John G. Bellord, Harry Booth, James Carroll, J. H. Caudell, John Christie, A. K. Connolly, James W. Connolly, John A. Connolly, S. F. Connolly, P. F. Dorte, LL.B., Victor I. Feeny, H. Malins Fisher, A. C. Fowler, W. B. Hallett, Anthony Hasslacher,Charles Hasslacher, Jerome S. Hegarty, J. D. Hodgson, . Skelton Hodgson, S. Taprell Holland (Hon. Treasurer), J. M. Hopewell, John Hurst, John Hussey, R. H. N. Johnson, J. Virtue Kelly, C. Temple Layton, C.C., Charles E. Lewis, Bernard J. McAdam, James P. McAdam (Hon. Secretary), J. M. McGrath, C. A. Mackenzie, Herbert J. T. Measures, E. H. Meyer, A. C. O’Bryen, M.I.E.E., Ernest A. O’Bryen, Wilfrid W. Parker, Louis Perry, Joseph J. Perry, R. J. Phillips, Henry Schiller, J. H. Sherwin, Robert Shield, Eugene Simona, Joseph Simona, Joseph Sperati, James Stone, J. S. R. Towsey, William Towsey, C. H. Walker, Augustine E. White, Basil J. White, C. B. Wildsmith, P. G. Winter, H. Witte, C. J. Woollett, M.D., &c., &c.

THE LOYAL TOASTS.

The Chairman, in proposing the toast “The Pope and the King,” said : Catholics need no explanation of the toast I have now the high honour of proposing. By coupling together the name of Pope and King we reaffirm and maintain and continue that old tradition of Church and State which has existed in all civilised Christian communities for so many hundreds of years. I give you the healths of his Holiness the Pope and of his Majesty the King, and when we drink this toast with all loyalty and all honour, it would be well to remember the words of the old cavalier. Speaking to his son in the days of the Civil War, he said : “Son, if the crown should come so low that thou seest it hanging upon a bush, still stick to it.” (Loud cheers.)

The Chairman : The next toast I have to propose is that of the Queen, the Prince and Princess of Wales, and other members of the Royal Family. This toast meets with an enthusiastic greeting wherever it is proposed, but I venture to think there is no place where it can strike a deeper and truer note of harmony and devotion than when it is proposed at the gathering of a Society which has for its object the relief of the poor and the suffering. (Cheers.) The prerogatives of the Crown and the privileges of Parliament have oftentimes been the cause of civil disturbances in this country, but to-day the prerogative of Royalty is to lessen in every possible way the sufferings of the poor and of those who toil and labour for a livelihood. (Hear, hear.) Into the privileges of Parliament I will not enter, but it is our special privilege to-night to recognise in a special manner all that we owe to the Queen, to the Prince and Princess of Wales, and other members of the Royal Family.

SIR W. BUTLER AND THE SOCIETY.

After these two toasts had been acknowledged with musical honours, the Chairman proposed the toast of the evening, ” The Benevolent Society for the Relief of the Aged and Infirm Poor.” He said : I have now to propose to you a toast which brings very vividly before my mind the fact of my own un-worthiness in being the medium through which this toast is to be offered to the gathering tonight. (No, no.) And when I look back to the names of those who in former years fulfilled this duty, my feelings approach those of absolute dismay, because I find the toast has been submitted by some of the most revered, the most honoured amongst the Catholic body of this country, both clerical and lay. I can only plead for myself and ask you to accept the fact of my unworthiness as an excuse for being unable to do adequate justice to my task. (No, no.) This charity goes back a long way. It suggests many thoughts to even the most superficial amongst us. It has had, I believe, now well-nigh I50 years of existence. (Hear, hear.) The people who founded it were very different to what we are to-day. They had a great deal more of the world’s kicks and a great deal less of the world’s happiness. One hundred and fifty years ago the clouds of the penal laws hung darkly over the country. I will not refer to them further beyond saying that the remembrance of that period should deepen and intensify our desire to do good to the poor, to those whom the abrogation or even the existence of penal laws matters little, and whose social life is set so far below those of happier circumstances. We take a great interest in politics, but how little we would care for the most sensational paragraph in The Daily Mail if we had no breakfast-table to spread it upon, and more, if we had no breakfast to enable us to digest its amazing contents. (Loud laughter.) I see in the newspapers a great deal about free food, the big loaf and the little loaf. I wonder what our poorer brethren think of all these things—the big loaf, the little loaf, and the three acres and a cow. (Hear, hear, and laughter.) I can fancy some of these poor people, who have waited many years for the fulfilment of some of these marvellous promises, exclaiming ” If you cannot give us three acres, give us at least the cow.” (Cheers.) If we cannot give them the cow we can at least put some milk into their tea. (Loud and continued cheers.) They have claims upon us,.these old veterans of the poor. We may ask ourselves who are they ? I think I am right in saying they are the survivors, the few survivors, of a great army. (Hear, hear.) They are the scattered survivors of tens of thousands of a great army of workpeople out of whose sweat we are living. (Hear, hear.) These old veterans become eligible as candidates for this Society only when they have reached the ripe old age of 60 years. Think for a moment how many of their comrades must have fallen on that long road which they have travelled for half a century, or even longer. I look at the list of pensioners and I see their ages reach from 60 to 90. Two facts come home to me when I read the report of the Society. The first is the liberal gifts and benefactions of many of the large merchant princes of this city. (Cheers.) The second fact is that so many who respond to the appeal of the Society are from my own country—Ireland. (Loud cheers.) You remember the story of the boat’s-crew cast adrift on the ocean. Believing their last hour had come they thought they should do something appropriate to the occasion. Unfortunately there was no one amongst them who remembered the prayers of their youth, so they decided upon making a collection. (Loud laughter.) I do not for a moment suppose that any of my brethren who were unfortunate enough to find themselves in a similar position would have to resort to making a contribution to the seals and the seagulls, but I do venture to say that the most prayerful man amongst us could not offer any truer praise to his Creator, or do a more charitable act to his fellow creature than to contribute generously and unstintingly to a Society such as that which we have met to honour this evening. (Cheers.) There are few names come down from the remote past more identified with this great city of London than the name of Martin the apostle, the Roman soldier before he was Roman Bishop. The speaker, after relating the story of Martin dividing his coat to protect a poor beggar from the ravages of the weather, and the vision which he afterwards saw, said London was still, outwardly at least, largely Martin. Perhaps some portion of his mantle, said the speaker in conclusion, has descended upon this great city, still keeping alive his name and the spirit of charity to the poor. (Cheers.)  3rd December 1904, Page 23

Bidwell – Roper Parkington 1896

 

 

A marriage has been arranged, and will shortly take place, between MR. LEONARD ARTHUR BIDWELL, F.R.C.S., 59, Wimpole-street, and DOROTHEA MARIE LOUISE, eldest daughter of Major J. Roper Parkington, 6, Devonshire-place.

The above text was found on p.30, 4th July 1896 in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

MARRIAGE.

BIDWELL—PARKINGTON.—On October 28, at St. James’, Spanish place, by the Very Rev. Canon Barry, assisted by the Very Rev. Provost Moore and the Rev. Herbert Laughton, Leonard Arthur Bidwell, F.R.C.S., of 59, Wimpole-street, W., to Dorothea Marie Louise, eldest daughter of Major Roper Parkington, J.P., of 6, Devonshire-place, W.

The above text was found on p.13, 14th November 1896 in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

St. Anselm’s Society For The Diffusion Of Good Books 1885

At first sight this seems to be rather dull, but worthy.  The more one reads on however some of the wording weaves between barking mad and rather sinister  “selecting such books as were free from danger to faith and morals”,…..  “their suitability to different kinds of readers”… “all would agree with him that the increase of infidel and harmful literature was unprecedented.”.. “Such literature was abhorrent to every Christian soul”…  Still at least it gave great great granny something to do.

 

The General Meeting of this Society was held on Wednesday afternoon, at Archbishop’s House, Westminster. His Eminence the Cardinal Archbishop presided, and amongst those present were the Bishop of Emmaus, the Marquis of Ripon, Lord Herries, the Very Rev. W. Lockhart, Inst. Char., the Revv. J. Bagshawe, D.D., G. Akers, H. Bittleston, J. Biemans, E. Lescher, S. McDaniel, H. Arden, Sir John and Lady Marshall, Colonel Prendergast, Mrs. Roper Parkington, Mrs. and Miss Clerke, Mr. Wegg-Prosser, Mr. Allies, Mr. Lyall, Miss Pownall, Mr. Bell, Mr. Britten, Mr. George Blount, Dr. Laing, Mr. Bellasis, &c.

The REV. CANON WENHAM, the Hon. Secretary, read the Report.

Its First Establishment.—St. Anselm’s Society was first set up in the year 1860. The original design of it was mainly due to the late Father Formby, who did not, however, continue long in connection with it, but left it to others to carry the design into execution. Those who were most instrumental in this were the late Lord Petre and the late Father Knox, of the Oratory, the present Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster, with the Very Rev. Father Morris, the Very Rev. Father William Eyre, Mr. Lloyd, the secretary, and the present secretary. The Society continued for several years in its work, collecting subscriptions and making grants of good books free, or at half price, and was in this way the means of putting several thousands of pounds’ worth of such books into circulation. But after a time the support given to it fell off, and the applications made to it became fewer and fewer. One cause of this was that the Society was expected to make a reduction to subscribers on all its books to an extent which, especially under the altered conditions of the book trade, it was not possible to make. That it did not entirely fall to the ground has been due to the support given to it by the President of the Conference of St. Vincent de Paul, Mr. Blount, who undertook the office of secretary, and kept it going during many years of discouragement.

A Fresh Start.—It may be well to explain briefly the circumstances that have led to its making a fresh start. It was partly because during the last two or three years the mischief done by indiscriminate reading of the books of the day has become more apparent and more frightful. Those who watch over us, as they that must give account of our souls, do not cease in pastorals and sermons and synodical letters to insist and enlarge on this danger. And the Holy See has repeatedly spoken on this subject in the strongest terms. With this conviction on their minds, the spirit of some who were well acquainted with our schools and colleges was stirred within them on seeing how little was being done to form in our young people a taste for wholesome literature and a conscience about indiscriminate reading, and that even the few books that were lent to the pupils to read or given them as prizes were often not of the kind that would be likely to cultivate their taste or excite their intelligence. It appeared on investigation that those who had to select the books oftentimes did not know what to order. They could not tell the character of books from their titles, and were at the mercy of booksellers and publishers, who, if not without knowledge of the books, were without knowledge of their suitability to the classes for whom they were ordered, and who were under special temptations to supply their own books, whether suitable or not. Here, then, it was thought, was a useful work for a Society like that of St. Anselm. If it could do little with the world at large to check unwholesome literature, yet at least it might give a helping hand to the hundreds and hundreds of our own convent schools and colleges throughout the country, that the money they laid out—and it must amount to a large sum each year —in books for prizes and school libraries, might be well laid out in books of the best sort for each class of readers It might be useful not only in selecting such books as were free from danger to faith and morals, but were the best of their kind, the most elevating and invigorating. And further, it might classify them according to their subject and character, and their suitability to different kinds of readers. With this view, then, the Council of St. Anselm’s Society set to work about a year ago to make a fresh start. It began by seeking for a local habitation in a central position, and had the good fortune to find, after some little search, its present premises, which, though not large, are sufficient for the purpose, and are in the neighbourhood of nearly all the similar institutions of London, and only five doors from the Strand at Charing Cross. And it has also been fortunate in finding a competent person, and experienced in bookselling, in the present manager. Busi; ness was thus commenced in a quiet way last June. The premises were fitted up sufficiently to make a beginning, and the Depository furnished with the books set down on its first lists.

Lists of Books.—These lists consist of the names of books selected from the catalogues of different publishers for their suitability to particular classes of readers. Nine such lists have now been issued ; the first was a list marked (C), of books suitable for libraries in elementary schools, with a second part (D), for the more advanced classes. For now that the education department recommends the establishment of such libraries, and takes them into account in awarding the mark of merit to the school, it seemed important to furnish lists of books that could be recommended for such libraries in Catholic schools. The next lists were (K), prize books for colleges, and (L), for convent schools, for it seemed deplorable that the large sums of money that are spent in this way should be laid out in books taken by chance or as the interest of the bookseller might direct, and not rather books such as we should really desire the pupils to make a study of. Two more lists (E and F), were next got out, the first for parochial libraries, and the second for more general and advanced readers. A short list (H) was printed of the best books of spiritual reading, with a supplement (G) of books of religious ‘instruction. But this last, at the suggestion of a high authority, has been expanded into a list of books of doctrine and controversy on the subjects of the day. This list is intended to answer, as far as may be, the questions so often asked as to what book is the best to explain particular doctrines and difficulties, to answer particular questions on religion, or to lend to people in particular states of mind or stages of advance towards faith and submission to the Church. The last list just published (M) requires a little special notice, as it differs from all the others in consisting, not of books selected and recommended as good books, but of books that may he read. People, it was urged, do not now buy the books they read, but hire them. If you wish, it was said, to direct their reading, you must look over the lists of books in the subscription libraries and tell them which they may read, and you must remember that if you attempt to restrain their reading too much about the subjects of the day, because these are dangerous, the most weak and least virtuous will only seek to emancipate themselves from a control which leaves them, as they think, behind the rest of the world. This was the argument, and the Society thought that at all events it would be doing a good work in forming a list selected from the subscription libraries of books which were the most safe and the least objectionable, while of course there are a large number of these books which are not only unexceptionable, but excellent.

Advantages.—The question is sometimes put to us, What advantage do we get by going to St. Anselm’s Society for books? Do you give a greater reduction than we can get elsewhere ? The answer is that we do not want to oppose or undersell the trade, but help to encourage it by making known the best works of all publishers. Nor could we undersell booksellers if we would, for the reduction made on cash sales is already as large as can be borne. While, therefore, St. Anselm’s Society invites readers to come to it for knowledge and choice of books, it does not ask that other booksellers should be left, and all orders should be sent to itself. Yet while it makes no profession—as at the time of its first establishment— of reducing the price of books below that of the trade, yet it is quite ready to reduce it as much, and in fact it makes a reduction of 25 per cent. all round, including those hooks which are dealt with exceptionally by the trade. Any one may take one of St. Anselm’s lists of selected books and tick off those he desires to have, and may send the list and a cheque for three-fourths of the whole sum to which the marked prices amount, and the Manager will send him the books, carriage free. There are publishers who will do as much with regard to their own books ; but St. Anselm’s Society will do this about the books of other publishers—about all good books—taking upon itself all the incidental expenses that may be the result of so doing. So far as this, then, the Society does offer some special advantages to those who order parcels of selected books.

Reprinting and Publishing,.—Lastly, the Society is ready to under-take the publication of books. There are not a few very good works which are out of print and cannot be obtained, and there are books indifferently translated and edited of which new editions are much wanted. The Society will readily enter into terms for reprinting such books, or publishing new works, so long as they are of a kind that falls within its scope, And as its great aim and end is not to make money, but to encourage and spread good books, it can afford perhaps more than others to be ” sweetly reasonable “ in dealing with editors and authors.

Officers and Associates.—Since the re-establishment of the Society it has had the misfortune to lose its President, Lord Petre. The members of the Society have reason to cherish his memory, of one who always endeavoured to attend its meetings, and showed great interest in its work, which he did his best to promote. The Council at their last meeting in January elected Lord Herries to fill his place, which he has kindly consented to do. At the same time the Council elected as permanent members of i is body a number of distinguished literary men, in order that it may have the benefit of their guidance, as well as their support, in any important questions of their. policy or work. The Council also elected eight members to manage the ordinary business of the Society, half of whom are to retire each year by rotation and their places to be filled up by election. Besides the permanent Council of authors, the Society has been able to obtain a valuable addition to its influence and working power in its Associates. When it began its fresh start a certain number of ladies, who felt the great importance of its work, engaged to give it their help, and united in an Association for Promoting the Reading of Good Books in Mission and School Libraries and Charitable Institutions. The Society now numbers forty of such associates, and is grateful to them for the valuable assistance they have given, especially in the selection of books. It has no better hope of success in its work than through the co-operation of these ladies, who will use their personal influence in their own localities to prevail on those about them to feed on good and wholesome literature, instead of what is poisonous.

Finance.—And now, in conclusion, something must be said as to the condition of the Society’s finances. And here we regret to have to make an admission which will have the tendency to set every right-minded Englishman against us. But the truth must be told—we have no balance at our bankers. The Society’s expenditure, indeed, during the past year, has, notwithstanding great economy, been fairly respectable. It has had the rent of the depository to pay for, to fit it up and furnish it with a decent amount of books ; it has had to pay for the printing of lists and circulars; to keep a manager and his assistant; to meet the expenses of advertising, petty cash, and sundries. We fear to injure our character in the world’s estimation by saying for how little all this was done. But it has not been done fur nothing; and—this is the disgraceful part of the story—it has not been done on our income. Our income is not respectable. We are surrounded by Societies like the Christian Knowledge Society, the Pure Literature Society, and others, whose income is counted by thousands. But St. Anselm’s Society set out last year with the modest sum of £86 13s. 8d., handed over by the late secretary. It has now about one hundred subscribers. Its total receipts from them during the past year and a quarter have amounted to £300. If St. Anselm in those old days, when he used to come to Mortlake to keep the feast of Easter, could have had a vision of the financial position which the Society bearing his name would hold in comparison with the non-Catholic Societies, he might have perhaps prophesied worse days for the Church in England than even those of William Rufus.

And now what is to be said in extenuation of the offence of having allowed expenditure to outrun income? This much. First, that no one need be under any apprehension for the Society, as care has been taken that the liability for this extra expenditure should fall entirely on those that are responsible for it. Secondly, a large portion of the expenses are incidental to the setting up of the Society’s business, and will not recur. Like every business it has to make a venture, but a reasonable venture, in order to get into working order and make itself known. Thirdly, the standing expense of the Depository is ono that may be expected to be met by the business done, and this though small as yet is increasing, and has begun to contribute towards current expenses. There is no reason why the business of St. Anselm’s Society in bookselling should not pay its expenses as well as any other bookselling business if it succeeds ; and it is beginning to succeed. But no doubt it must, at least in the first instance, depend on the support it receives from subscriptions. At the outset it must appeal for help towards its working expenses. And it appeals earnestly also for assistance to furnish the Depository with specimen copies of books, to make grants of books to charitable institutions, and to enable it to reprint and publish books that are called for. Other institutions of this kind are liberally supported by their own adherents, and the Society of St. Anselm appeals to the Catholic body to give it liberal aid for one or more of these objects, that it may be able worthily to represent Catholic interests in the literary world.

The MARQUIS OF RIPON, in moving the adoption of the Report, said his task was a very easy one, because he was sure that those who had listened to it while it was being read—giving as it did so clear a history of the objects and proceedings of this Society—would feel that the Society was well worthy of the support of English Catholics. The main object of the Society, as set forth in the Report was this : ” If it could do little with the world at large to check unwholesome literature, yet at least it might give a helping hand to the hundreds and hundreds of our own convent schools and colleges throughout the country, that the money they laid out—and it must amount to a large sum each year—in books for prizes and school libraries, might be well laid out in books of the best sort for each class of readers.” Any one who had had to select prizes for schools and colleges, especially in the country, must have felt the difficulty of making anything like a good selection. What happened generally was this—they went to the nearest bookseller, and chose those books which were nicely bound, and at the same time within the amount they had to spend. Generally there was very considerable difficulty, and the result was that the prizes were not always of the character they ought to be. The selection depended upon the extent of the bookseller’s stock, and this was particularly the case when they wanted books suitable to Catholic societies. Not only was the value of the prizes diminished, but there was the risk that no small amount of mischief might be done. It must always be remembered that prize books were not only to be admired for their bindings, but they were to be read and studied, and they came into the hands of the students with all the authority of the school to recommend them.

It seemed to him, therefore, that the work this Society was doing in issuing the lists of which the Report spoke, was very useful and valuable work indeed. It performed for Catholics a work which was done for Anglicans by the wealthy societies like the Christian Know-ledge Society and others. It was most important that those who have the management of the education of the young, should have a ready means of obtaining suitable books for children. Another important branch of the work was the list of books in circulating libraries  and looking over that list, he could not help remarking that it was drawn up in no narrow or restricted spirit. He did not think he need detain them any longer. He moved the adoption of the Report, and in doing so he commended St. Anselm’s Society to the continued support of its friends and of Catholics at large, confident that it was doing a very valuable work, while the state of its funds was not creditable to those who ought to sustain it with liberality.

The REV. G. AKERS, in seconding the motion, said : No one could mix as the clergy and many of the laity did with the people, and especially with the poor, without seeing the taint cast into their lives and their faith by reading books, not actually bad, but which contained the suggestion of what was evil. Many books were based upon false principles, and, although admired by all for their artistic merit, yet were as a snake in the grass. Who was to help them in the selection of books ? To make a right selection one had to look into the books, and for each of them to do that separately for themselves was rather a waste of good labour, while the result was, after all, unsatisfactory. That being so, these lists became very valuable to those who felt keenly the curse of this bad literature, and yet who found the work of selection a great difficulty. They wanted some one to help them in that matter, and to tell them which books were safe from the insidious danger of hidden wrong. The British spirit was inclined to resent any interference in matters of this kind, so that this work must be done very gently. It was impossible to have it done more gently than it was by this Society. They had to protect their people and children in their words as well as in their acts, and he did not see how any one could find fault with so excellent a Society as this. He hoped that they would not forget that the work of the St. Anselm’s Society was not merely the keeping of a store—its aim and ends was the diffusion of good books. They had to make a new start, and new work must be carried out. He hoped that fresh ways would be found by which good books might he diffused amongst the people, and he was certain that the work would grow immensely. They must take it up in a solid and earnest way worthy of the Church, and so check the spreading of the curse and poison of bad literature. The motion to was then agreed to nem. con.

LORD HERRIES, in moving the second resolution, said he must preface the few remarks he was about to make by saying how honoured he felt some months ago when he was elected President of this Society. He had taken great interest in the Society, and was attracted to it at first by the name of St. Anselm. He thought he ought, as President, to tender his thanks to his Eminence the Cardinal Archbishop for allowing them to come there for the meeting, and for his kindness in taking the chair on this occasion. The resolution he had to propose was really one to inform the public what the Society was. He proposed : ” That while the diffusion of good books is at all times a useful_and desirable object, it becomes especially important at the present time when immoral, heretical, and infidel publications are circulated to an unprecedented extent amongst all classes.” When the Society was founded some twenty years ago, the circumstances were not so bad as they were at present, and all would agree with him that the increase of infidel and harmful literature was unprecedented. Such literature was abhorrent to every Christian soul, and it was time for a Society like this to spread in Catholic society books which had a healthy tone ; the spread of healthy literature not only would prevent people reading bad books, but it would have a still greater effect in keeping the seeds of faith in the minds of our countrymen. They wanted the support of the clergy in this matter, and he believed that if the clergy took an interest in the formation of parish libraries they would be doing a great deal of good. In Yorkshire there was a mechanics’ union of village libraries, including 180 villages with 200, ow books. He did not see why they should not have Catholic village libraries, with this Society as the headquarters of such a movement.

The REV. DR. BAGSHAWE seconded the resolution. There was, he said, no doubt about the increased power of the press in these days, but while its power was increasing its tone was growing worse. The only way to meet this state of things was to descend into the field, and by producing and circulating good books use the same weapons as their enemies, provide good sound literature for the poor, not only for their own people, but for the masses of the population generally.

The motion was agreed to.

COLONEL PRENDERGAST next moved : ” That since the tendency of the popular literature of the day has become a subject of earnest solicitude to the Holy See ; and since the Bishops of England, in a Synodical Letter, have called on the Catholic laity to aid in counteracting the evil agencies at work through the medium of cheap publications, it becomes an urgent duty on the part of the faithful at large to take measures for responding to their appeal.” He confessed that he had been very much struck by the Report that had been read to the meeting, and he congratulated the Secretary, Canon Wenham, upon its production. It opened up so large a scope for this Society, that he could only venture to make a few remarks upon one or two points in it. He could not conceive how any class could be excluded from the operations of the Society, and he would therefore put in a claim for young persons of the higher classes. In middle and higher class schools there was a great disposition to reading, such as hardly existed some years ago. He remembered the formation of a school library at Eton, which at the time was regarded as an extraordinary thing, but now all large schools had their libraries. They were creating amongst the youth of the country a great appetite for reading, and with that came a certain responsibility upon those interested in young people to see that when they left school they would know how to choose the good and leave the evil books. He thought the circulating library list was especially valuable, and he said that more particularly as the father of a family.

In this country they had a wonderfully good literature, they had a mass of good books, and he was delighted to find that Canon Wenham had been at the trouble of preparing these useful lists. They wanted to know in some accessible way what to order from the circulating libraries which in modern days were powerful organisations. He believed that Mudie’s Library first came into existence to supply a clientele of evangelical proclivities, and that that was the making of that celebrated library. He was not sure that they could not get some lending libraries to order books to suit Catholics. He was delighted to find that general literature was not to be discouraged, because every now and then a book would appear—a book perhaps trifling apparently, but which would effect a revolution. They all knew that some years ago the places of worship in the Established Church were not what they ought to be, but now it was frequently difficult to know at once whether they were in a Catholic or an Anglican Church. He believed that the change was to be attributed, in a great measure, to a little book published some years ago called St. Autholicus. It was not, he thought, beyond the scope of this Society to encourage some kinds of ephemeral literature which would have a powerful effect for good. One word more : there was a slight note of despondency which perhaps was not to be wondered at, in the concluding sentences of the Report, but he did not think that they could always judge of the work of a Society, or of its true value, by the state of its funds. The officials no doubt were apt to take that view, but work like that of this Society had means of touching people of which the Society itself had no conception. A general effect was produced even by small means. He could only hope that the words of his resolution would find a response in the hearts of Catholics, and that the laity of the Church would rouse themselves and put themselves in contact with this Society to their own advantage and for the promotion of education in this country.

The VERY REV. W. LOCKHART, in seconding the motion, said he should confine his remarks for the most part to cheap literature. Colonel Prendergast very properly pointed out the importance of wholesome literature for the educated classes, but there was one thing which must be weighing on every Catholic who comes into contact with the masses of the people. He was sure it weighed on the heart of his Eminence and on the hearts of many priests who have to do with the people. That was that they were being ruined in thousands by cheap and bad literature. It was clearly one of the objects of this Society to do what could be done for all classes. It was the one Society they had for promoting Christian knowledge—the one Society which had the right to that high title. They had heard what it had been able to do in the course of its twenty years’ existence, and while they gave all credit and praise to those who had been foremost in the work of the Society, yet he thought they must all feel a tingling of shame when they considered that it bad done no more. Twenty years or more of life and that was all that it had been able to do. How was it that Catholics could do no more ? He spoke of the laity, for the clergy were so full of work. The Church of England and the dissenting bodies were examples in this respect which they ought to imitate. They were put to shame by what the Protestants—the Samaritans—were doing. He heard it said by Mr. Spurgeon that when a man went to him reproach-ing himself with his wasted life and neglected opportunities, that eloquent preacher would say : ” What are you going to do for other people, if you turn to God you must love your neighbour, for how can you love God, whom you have not seen, if you love not your neighbour whom you have seen.” Mr. Spurgeon puts his people into harness, and those who knew what was being done at Newington amongst a debased population, know the immense amount of good that was being done by the laity—both men and women—gathered round that preacher. There were many other instances to be found to show what the Samaritans were doing to shame the true Church. The country was being ruined and souls were being destroyed in thousands by bad literature. What were the Catholics doing to prevent this circulation of garbage, and to give better books in its stead ? His experience was this, that the laity did not sufficiently co-operate with the clergy. The Church of England laity and others supported their large societies for promoting Christian knowledge, &c., by large subscriptions and donations. He would be pleased if this meeting put into their hearts a practical and persevering zeal to imitate what was being done by others outside the true Church.

The resolution was agreed to unanimously.

The CARDINAL ARCHBISHOP said be had listened with great interest to the Report of this Society, which was founded nearly twenty-five years ago. There was, however, one great omission in the Report, and that was the name of Canon Wenham amongst those who have been associated with the Society from the beginning. The importance of this Society was immense, and he felt that to be so when twenty-five years ago he was asked to support it. He was very glad to be reminded of a fact he had quite forgotten. Four years after the foundation of this Society—in 1864—it fell to his lot to obtain the sanction of the Holy Father Pope Pius IX. to this Society. He had forgotten the fact. He was afraid that he had done very little but sympathise with this work. Lord Herries had been kind enough to thank him for receiving them that day and for presiding. He hoped that this Society from this day would meet there—this house would always be open to It seemed to him that a Society of this sort could not be under a better roof than his house. So many things had been touched upon that he would confine what he had to say to the importance of a society for the dissemination of good books. He was very often asked questions which perplexed him as to whether this or that book would be on the Index or not. He could not answer such questions, but it was perfectly certain that in this country all they could do was to sail at the Index without any hope of ever reaching it, just as a sailor sailed for the North Pole. Although it was impossible to lay down definite rules in this matter, yet they should keep the rules of the Index before their minds, and that was what this Society had done. He was glad to find that there was a large amount, of innocent and instructive literature before them, and Canon Wenham had exercised a wise discretion in issuing these lists of books. He could recollect the history of the Christian Knowledge Society. It was originally in the hands of a Protestant firm, but it was found that that firm were deriving a very large profit. It was determined to take it out of their hands, and to create a Society to carry on the whole machinery of a large trade. The effect of that was to enormously increase the circulation of the books, and good authors were attracted to the Society. The books the Christian Knowledge Society published were most beautiful and instructive, and they were written by some of the best men of the day. Books they could get for eightpence were valuable beyond anything they possessed in other ways. It fell to his lot to go into this subject, and he had received a proposal upon this subject which possibly might be accepted with advantage. When he saw that the St. Anselm Society had discernment and discretion in the selection of books—when he saw that they lacked nothing but capital, it struck him that the Society might make terms with some large firm of publishers, and so enormously increase the operations of the Society. They did not want to make a profit, but only to multiply good books. The proposal before him which he thought the Society would accept, might enable them to begin a Catholic Literary Society something like the Christian Knowledge Society. He would ask Canon Wenham to confer with him on the subject.

The BISHOP OF EMMAUS in moving a vote of thanks to the Cardinal Archbishop, said that the meeting had gladdened his heart. The work of the Society might have been a small work, but it was good work. The work of selecting books was indeed most important. With regard to the Christian Evidence Society, when he recently went into that Society’s shop he was amazed with what he saw. He had noticed with regret the death of Mrs. Ewing, whose little book called Jack-a-Napes, he regarded as an admirable work, and he had recently given no fewer than twenty copies of it away.

The vote of thanks having been seconded by CANON WENHAM, it was briefly acknowledged by his Eminence, and the proceedings then terminated.

The above text was found on p.26, 23rd May 1885 in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

John Roper Parkington’s obituary – The Times, January,1924

SIR JOHN ROPER PARKINGTON.

The funeral of Sir John Roper Parkington took place yesterday at Mortlake Cemetery. Before the interment Solemn Requiem Mass was sung at the Church of the Sacred Heart, Edge-hill, Wimbledon, to which the body had been removed from Broadwater Lodge over- night. The celebrant was the Rev. Father Ignatius O’Gorman, assisted by the Rev. Father R. Dalrymple, as deacon, and Mr. Rogers, as sub-deacon. Lady Parkington was unable to be present owing to ill-health, and the chief mourners were Lady Sherston Baker | (daughter), Miss Sherston Baker (grand- daughter), Mrs. Bidwell (daughter), the Misses Bidwell (granddaughters), Mr. Thomas and Mr. Edward Bidwell (grandsons), Mr. and Mrs. Cary-Elwes (son-in-law and daughter), the Misses Cary-Elwes (granddaughters), and Mr. Evelyn, Mr. Eustace, and Mr. Oswald Cary- Elwes (grandsons). Others present included Bishop Bidwell. Miss Faudel-Phillips. Mr. G. H. Barton,, Mr. W. N. Osborne Miss Hardy, Mr. C ffennell. Mr. L. Constable. Father Bampton. S..J.. representatives of City Companies and organizations with which Sir Roper Parkington was connected. and of the 3rd Battalion East Surrey Regiment and the 7th (V.B.) Essex Regiment, of which he had been a maJor and honorary colonel respectively.

The Times, January 18, 1924. p 15

Admission of Sheriffs of the City of London, 1896

I like the fact that this one has two great,great grandfathers at it even though neither of them would have known it, and by the time they were interlinked, one [Alfred Purssell] had been dead twenty seven years, and the other [John Roper Parkington] dead four months. This is from The Times, on Tuesday, September 29, 1896.

Admission of Sheriffs

Yesterday Mr. Alderman James Thompson Ritchie and Mr. Deputy Robert Hargreaves Rogers, who were elected by the Livery at midsummer as Sheriffs of the City of London for the year ensuing, were formally admitted to office at Guildhall. The proceedings were conducted with all the ancient and quaint ceremonial customary on the occasion. The Lord Mayor, accompanied by Mr. Alderman and Sheriff Pound and Mr. Sheriff Cooper, the retiring Sheriffs, and attended by the Sword and Mace Bearers and the City Marshal, went in state from the Mansion-house, and on arriving at Guildhall were escorted to the Aldermen’s Chamber, where the Aldermen, the Recorder, the Chamberlain, and the other high officers had assembled.

The Great Hall, Guildhall, London

There they were joined by the new Sheriffs, with whom were the masters, wardens, and courts of the Bakers’, Ship-wrights’, and Loriners’ Companies, to which they belong. The Sheriffs-Elect were formally introduced to the Aldermen by Alderman Sir Stuart Knill and Alderman and Colonel Davies, M.P. A procession was then formed and the civic dignitaries passed to the hustings in the great hall, where a considerable number of persons, including many ladies, had gathered to witness the ceremony.

The Common Cryer (Colonel Eustace Burnaby) having called upon Mr. Alderman Ritchie and Mr. Deputy Rogers to come forward and take upon themselves the office of Sheriff, these gentlemen presented themselves amid cheers. The Town Clerk (Sir John Monckton) then administered to each the declarations prescribed by the Promissory Oaths Act and couched in the quaint language of former times. In these they promised loyalty to the Sovereign and protection to the franchise of the City of London.

They would well and lawfully keep the Shire of the City “ and right they would do, as well to poor as rich, and good custom they would none break, nor evil custom arrere.”  They would not tarry the judgments and executions of the Sheriffs’ Court without reasonable cause ” nor right would they none disturb.” They would promote the Queen’s profit in all things that belonged to their office as far as they legally could or might, and they would not respite or delay to levy the Queen’s debts for any gift, promise, reward, or favour where they might raise the same without great grievance to the debtor. They would do no wrong to any man for any gift, reward, or promise, nor for favour nor hatred. Finally, they would truly and diligently execute the good laws and statutes of the realm, and in all things well and truly behave themselves in their office for the honour of the Queen and the good of her subjects and discharge the same according to the best of their skill and power.

Tho Sheriffs-Elect having signed the declarations, the late Sheriffs took off their official robes and chains and placed the chains of office upon each of the new Sheriffs- Mr. Alderman Pound investing Mr. Alderman and Sheriff Bitchie and Mr. Cooper discharging a similar function for Mr. Sheriff Rogers. The ceremony then ended and the civic authorities left the hall.

Mr. Alderman and Sheriff Ritchie, who is an elder brother of the President of the Board of Trade, is the head of the firm of Messrs. W. Ritchie and Sons, jute spinners and merchants, of Lime-street and Silver- town, and has been Alderman of the Ward of Tower since 1892, when he succeeded the late Mr. Alderman Gray. His colleague Mr. Sheriff Rogers is a member of the firm of Messrs. R. H. and S. Rogers, linen manufacturers, of Addle-street, City, and Coleraine, in Ireland, and has been a Common Councilman for Cripplegate Ward since 1886 and Deputy-Alderman since 1890. Their Under-Sheriffs are Mr. Webster Glynes, solicitor, of 29, Mark-lane, and Mr. Clarence Richard Halse, solicitor, of 61, Cheapside, and their chaplains are the Rev. C. J. Ridgeway, vicar of Christ Church, Paddington, and the Rev. J. S. Barrass, rector of St. Michael Bassishaw.

Clothworkers Hall, Mincing Lane, London

After the ceremony of their inauguration, Mr. Alderman and Sheriff Ritchie and Mr. Sheriff and Deputy Rogers proceeded to Clothworkers’-hall, in Mincing- lane, where they entertained a large company at breakfast. Mr. Alderman and Sheriff Ritchie presided, and his colleague in the shrievalty occupied the seat on his left. The guests included Mr. C. T. Ritchie, M.P., Alderman Sir Stuart Knill, Alderman Lieutenant- Colonel Davies, M.P.. Mr. Alderman Newton, Alderman Sir J. C. Dimsdale, Mr. Alderman Truscott, Alderman Sir J. V. Moore, Mr. Alderman Green, Mr. Alderman Samuel, Mr. Alderman Bell, Mr. Aldelman Alliston, Mr. Alderman Halse, Sir W. J. R. Cotton (the Chamberlain), Sir Forrest Fulton, Q.C. (the Common Serjeant), Mr. Alfred Lyon, Mr. Matthew Wallace (the Chief Commoner), Mr. Walter H. Harris, Mr. T. K. Freeman, Mr. J. S. Phené (warden of the Clothworkers’ Company).Mr.W. M. Bickerstaff, the Rev. R. H. Hadden (Lord Mayor’s chaplain), the Rev. C. J. Ridgway, the Rev. J. S. Barrass, Mr. Under-Sheriff Glynes, Mr. Under-Sheriff Halse, Dr. R. T. Pigott, Mr. Deputy Pepler, Mr. Deputy Cox, Mr. Deputy Pimm, Mr. Deputy Atkins, Mr. Deputy Baddelley, Mr. Deputy Edmeston, Mr. Deputy Dowling, Lieutenant-Colonel Milman, Major Roper Parkington, Mr. W. H. Collingridge. Colonel Browne, V.C., Mr. A. Purssell, Mr. W. J. Johnston, Colonel Davies Sewell, Mr. A. B. Hudson, Mr. J. A. Britton, Mr. J. H. Lile, and Mr. Graham King .

Mr. Alderman and Sheriff Ritchie, who was warmly received, in proposing ” The Health of the Queen,” after reminding them that if her Majesty were spared until next June she would have reigned over them for 60 years, remarked that the historian of the future, when describing the events of the Victorian era. would write it down as the most glorious in the annals of history. (Cheers.)

Mr. Sheriff and Deputy Rogers, who also received a cordial greeting, afterwards proposed ” The Prince and Princess of Wales and the other Members of the Royal Family.”

Mr. Alderman and Sheriff Ritchie, in proposing    The Houses of Parliament, “ remarked that Englishmen were proud of their ancient institutions – institutions which had come down to them through the ages, and which had been moulded and fashioned by successive generations to meet the requirements of the people and of the times. They had at the present time a House of Lords and a House of Commons – and he might add, by way of parenthesis, a Corporation of the City of London (Cheers) – which at once excited the envy and the admiration of the world. (Cheers.) The House of Lords, as they were all aware, was composed of a body of men of high culture, marked ability, and great patriotism, and he believed that the verdict of the public was generally in its favour. With regard to the House of Commons, it was elected by the people themselves, and it was good or bad as the people themselves made it. Opinions differed, no doubt, with respect to the quality of the present House, but they all had an instance not long since that it considered the country superior to party. (Cheers.)

Mr. Ritchie, M.P., in responding to the toast, observed that the House of Lords differed in one essential respect from the House of Commons. The House of Commons came and went, while the House of Lords went on for ever; and he confessed that that was one of the characteristics of the House of Lords which members of the House of Commons envied most. (Laughter.) Reference had been made to the peculiar position of the House of Lords with respect to its constitution, and he had no doubt that the constitution of the House of Lords was what was usually called an anomaly. As far, however, as he was concerned, he was not frightened at the word ” anomaly.” Our constitution was full of anomalies, which, as the proposer of the toast had said, had grown up from year to year in order to meet the times; and it was a remarkable fact that, anomalous as was the position of the House of Lords, there was not a country in the world which did not regard it as the very embodiment of excellence for a second Chamber. (Cheers.)

There was this other anomaly in connexion with the House of Lords-that although the House of Commons was an elected body and the House of Lords was not – it so happened that the latter sometimes more adequately represented the opinion of the people than the elected Chamber. (Hear, hear.)

That, however, was an anomaly which had been of great service sometimes to the people of this country. Again and again the House of Lords had saved the country from unreflecting legislation by the House of Commons which might have had disastrous consequences; and he ventured to think that if they were to look back to the last occasion on which this had taken place it would be found that members of the party to which he belonged were not the only men in the kingdom who said “Thank God, we have a House of Lords.” (Cheers.)

The people of this country were satisfied with the patriotism of the House of Lords, believing that no unselfish aims, no pledges to constituents, warped the judgement of its members when matters of importance came before them,but that their decision was given in an unbiased way, and in a manner which they thought would best serve the interests of the country. (Cheers.) There had been times when the House of Lords had been attacked,but he had not of late heard very much said against it, nor did he think they were likely to for some time to come. So far as the House of Commons was concerned, he believed that some of them were quite satisfied with its present composition, while, no doubt, there were others who were not so satisfied ; but he assumed that the toast had been drunk so heartily because they believed that the House of Commons, however it might be constituted, deserved well of the country as a rule. (Hear, hear.)

The present House of Commons had already done some good work, and it would do more in time ; and he believed the probabilities were that when it came to its end it would have reaped as many laurels as any House of Commons that had preceded it. (Cheers.) There was one thing which the House of Commons and the country were fully aware of – that the House had not been elected for the purpose of carrying out revolutionary or sensational legislation or to pass into law all the fads of the various sections of the community. (Cheers.)

They had had a clear mandate from the country that the days of legislation of that kind – at least for the present – were over, and that the people expected the present House of Commons to devote itself to legislation which would be for the benefit and the interest of all classes of the community. (Hear, hear.)

He believed that that was the legislation which the House of Commons would devote itself to, and that this would meet with the approval of the people of this country. He was returning thanks for the toast in circumstances somewhat peculiar. It had been proposed by one of the Sheriffs, who was a very near relative of his (Cheers), and he need hardly say, therefore, that he responded to it with special pleasure. Some of them who desired to take part in public life took one path and some of them took another. Some chose the path of municipal life, others the path of Imperial work. Both paths were equally honourable, and both led to the same end, but he believed that if there was a choice between the one and the other, it would be found that municipal work, well and honestly done, did more for the welfare and happiness of the community than Parliamentary work did. (Hear, hear, and cheers.)

Mr. Sheriff and Deputy Rogers, afterwards proposed  “ The Lord Mayor and the Corporation of the London.”  Having referred to the dignified manner in which the present Lord Mayor (Sir Walter Wilkin) had discharged the duties of his high office, the speaker observed that the Corporation of London was the oldest and most Democratic body in the world. It had always been to the front in protecting the interests and the freedom of the citizens of London, while in quite recent times the Corporation had proved its usefulness in such works as the Holborn Viaduct and the Tower Bridge.

Alderman Sir Stuart Knill, in responding to the toast, said they all felt that the atmosphere had of late cleared, and the great benefit which had been rendered by Lord Mayors and the Corporation in ancient times as well as in the present day was now acknowledged. He felt it a special privilege to respond to the toast, because the present Lord Mayor honoured him during his term of office by being one of his sheriffs. (Cheers.)

Mr. Alderman and Sheriff Ritchie, next proposed ” The Livery Companies.” They were assembled, he said, in the hall of one of the greatest of the City guilds –  a company which stood high in the ranks of the livery companies, and which was also one of the greatest in its charities. (Hear, hear.) The Cloth-workers’ Company spent large sums yearly on technical education, but he believed that all the City companies were doing what they could in their different ways to promote the education of the people. He was convinced that if another commission investigated their affairs the conclusion it would arrive at would be that the funds which were at the disposal of the City companies could not be better dealt with than they were at the present time. (Hear, hear.)

Captain James Watson (Master of the Bakers’ Company) responded to the toast.

Alderman Lieutenant-Colonel Davies, M.P., in proposing ” The Sheriffs, “ referred to the antiquity of their office, and wished them a pleasant and agreeable year.

Mr. Alderman and Sheriff Ritchie, in acknowledging the toast, said that, as those present were aware, his colleague and himself did not play the principal parts in “ this Corporation annual.” The chief role was to be taken by another, who had not yet been chosen; but as he was somewhat behind the scenes, he might tell them a secret -the gentleman who was to be chosen was Mr. Alderman Faudel Philips (Cheers), to assist whom his colleague and himself would do their very best.

Mr. Sheriff and Deputy Rogers, also responded, and subsequently proposed ” The Retiring Sheriffs,”  warmly testifying to the able way in which Mr. Alderman Pound and Mr. Cooper had discharged their duties.

Mr. Alderman and Ex-Sheriff Pound responded. The company shortly afterwards separated.

Closure of the Montenegrin Relief Fund 1924.

Podgoritza

MONTENEGRIN RELIEF FUND. It is announced that the Montenegrin Relief Fund, which was instituted at the out- break of the Great War by Sir John Roper Parkington, Consul-General for Montenegro in Great Britain, who died last year, is about to be closed. About £80,000 in all was collected,[ the modern day equivalent would be about £ 24,000,000]  and many thousands of destitute Montenegrin refugees were helped, including a member of the late King’s family and some of the Cabinet and representatives of the aristocracy. A large number of refugees proceeded to America. Outstanding contributions should be sent to the fund’s offices, 30, Bucklersbury, E.C.4, addressed to Sir William H. Thomas.

The Times, July 29, 1924. p.15