Tag Archives: Cardinal Manning

Rome 2nd February 1878

1878 was a busy year in Rome. Vittorio Emmanuele II died on the 9th January. The Pope died five days after this was published, on 7 February 1878 at 5:40 pm, of epilepsy, which led to a seizure and a sudden heart attack, while saying the rosary with his staff.  Pius IX was the longest serving Pope ever, and the last pope who held temporal powers, although Lazio, and Rome itself were absorbed into the Kingdom of Italy in 1870. Meanwhile, the still at this point, Rev. Dr Henry O’Bryen seems to be settled in splendidly, having stopped being a parish priest in Lancashire five years earlier at the age of thirty eight, and moved to Rome.  He doesn’t become a papal chaplain until 1881. But he is already preaching at S. Andrea  della Fratte, which he continued to do for the next seventeen years.

Rome from our own correspondent Rome Jan 27th 1878

Reports were current in Rome on Thursday the 24th of  January that Pius IX had been suddenly taken ill and was at the point of death. For these reports there was absolutely no foundation. His Holiness all through the week held his usual audiences lying on the couch in his private library. On Monday he blessed the two lambs whose wool is intended for the palliums. On that day  he received many Cardinals and prelates, and on the following day some laymen of distinction were admitted to special audience in the library. Cardinals Manning and Howard were among the visitors this week to the Vatican. On Thursday a distinguished person, who had an interview with his Holiness for half an hour, found the Pope considerably improved in health and spirits. The wounds in the legs are healing up naturally, new flesh growing in a wonderful manner. The Holy Father was unusually cheerful, and expressed a hope to be able to leave his bed in a month or so when the severe weather shall have disappeared.

GARIBALDI:  It is known that General Garibaldi wrote a letter  of congratulation to King Humbert on his accession to the throne. It was not published, because Garibaldi, at the close of his letter, advised his Majesty to dismiss all his “reprobate Ministers.”

Umberto I

KING HUMBERT I. :  On the 19th of January the new King took the oath to observe the Constitution before the senators and deputies assembled in the Parliament House in Montecitorio. On the same occasion the senators and deputies swore allegiance to the King. The Queen, the young Prince of Naples, and all the Royal visitors and envoys, were present in the diplomatic box, or gallery, where seats were arranged for the ladies. The Archduke Renier, the Prince Imperial of Germany, the heir to the Portuguese throne, and the Queen of Portugal were all close to Queen Margherita. The young Portuguese Prince, a pretty boy of fourteen years, was much admired. But the Prince Imperial of Germany, with his broad shoulders, was the prominent figure, and had the post of honour near the two Queens. The new King made a speech, which was much applauded, but which did not contain a single word in reference to God or the Church, nor did it ask, directly or indirectly, the blessing of Heaven. Perhaps Humbert I., who separates himself by the numeral I. from his ancestor Humbert III., the Blessed, was conscious that any appeal to Divine Providence would be out of place in the declarations of a monarch who succeeds to the usurped patrimony of the Church. King Humbert, rightly or wrongly, is believed to be less religious than his father. Signor Mancini, the present Minister of Grace and Justice, was once his teacher in international and criminal jurisprudence, and from Signor Mancini it is not likely that much reverence for the Catholic religion could be learned by the young Prince. So far as can be inferred from recent events, King Humbert willrely on the army and on the German alliance to support his throne against all Republican attacks. To keep Germany on his side he must obey the behests of Prince Bismarck, and he must adopt a policy of antagonism towards the Holy See more pronounced and severe than that adopted by his father. In this anti-Catholic policy Signor Mancini will be his willing guide.

Cardinal Manning

 

CARDINAL MANNING:  His Eminence Cardinal Manning has lately  occupied much attention on the part of the Italian  press.  Fanjulla devoted to him a long article denouncing him for his want of respect to the memory of Victor Emmanuel, and particularly for refusing a high Mass to be sung for his late Majesty. Of course, it is well known in London that Cardinal Manning granted permission for the High Mass, although he hesitated and required additional in-formation concerning the intentions of the applicants. Other Italian newspapers claim Cardinal Manning as their friend and champion, and gravely assert that his Eminence alone among the Cardinals encourages the Holy Father to condone the loss of the temporal power, and come to terms of amity with the revolution ! He is said also to urge the selection of Malta for the next Conclave, and to have raised the resentment of all the Italian Cardinals against him. In all these statements there is not one syllable of truth.

 

 

OUTRAGES AGAINST THE CLERGY:  In various cities of Italy the revolutionists have  taken the opportunity of the King’s death to insult  the Bishops and clergy who do not at once comply  with the demands of political partisans. For instance, two members of the municipality of Piacenza waited on the Bishop of that city, and asked the use of the Cathedral for a funeral service for the late King. The Bishop replied that he could not himself pontificate, but would grant the use of the cathedral provided the laws of the Church were observed. He suggested the use of the Church of S. Francesco in Piazza, as more central and better adapted for the occasion than the Cathedral. He desired them to report his remarks to the municipal council, and to return the next day to arrange everything. The members of the municipality, however, misrepresented the words of the Bishop as an absolute refusal of the Cathedral, and inserted a statement to that effect in a local journal. The consequence was a riotous assemblage of roughs, who mobbed the Bishop, broke into his residence, and filled the town with tumult. The military had to be called out to quell the disorder. At Viterbo, Bologna, Venice, and other places, the clergy have been insulted and attacked by mobs of revolutionists. At Parma the Bishop was assailed the citizens were compelled to close their shops as a sign of mourning, and a tricolour flag was hoisted over the episcopal residence.

MILAN: At the funeral service in Milan Cathedral, on the 24th, in honour of the late King, the crush was so great that five persons were killed, and many others were injured, and had to be carried to hospitals.

PERE RATISBONNE:  On Sunday, the 20th, the Church of S. Andrea  della Fratte was magnificently decorated with red  satin damask bordered with gold, and an infinity of lights for the anniversary of the miraculous event in the life of Pere Ratisbonne, who, on the 20th of January, 1842, was there converted from Judaism by an apparition of the Blessed Virgin. Masses were said during the morning, and at five p.m. Cardinal Franchi gave solemn Benediction. Padre Giovanni, who possesses perhaps the finest tenor voice at present known, sang; and there was hardly standing room in the church. On Wednesday, the 23rd, the Rev. Dr. O’Bryen preached a sermon on the conversion of Pere Ratisbonne to a crowded audience in the same church. [ Alphonse Ratisbonne who was Jewish, converted to the Church, became a Jesuit, and went on to found the Congrégation de Notre-Dame de Sion, on of whose founding aim was the conversion of the Jews.]

APOTHEOSIS OF VICTOR EMMANUEL:  An amusing cartoon has appeared representing  the late King rising heavily heavenwards—his  well-known features appearing above the white sheet that envelopes his body. In the clouds is seen the Piedmontese Walhalla ” The Superga,” and out of it are issuing the deceased members of the house of Savoy. This cartoon has been considered sufficiently curious for the Bodleian library, to which a copy has been sent.

THE CLERGY HISSED:  It appears, unhappily, certain that the small party of clergy who surrounded the Crucifix in the procession of the King’s funeral were hissed. People who saw the procession at different points all assert the same.

Palazzo del Quirinale

 

OVATION AT THE QUIRINAL:  On the return of the King from the Chambers  on Saturday, the 19th, there was a great burst of  cheering on the part of the crowd assembled in  the Piazza del Quirinale; the King, the Queen, their Royal visitors, and the little Prince of Naples all appeared on the balcony—the Prince Imperial of Germany, taking the little Prince of Naples in his arms, held him up, to the great delight of the crowd, and then kissed him.

 

 

A PROPHECY: An astrologer of the Apennines, named Barbanera, in whom the Romans have great faith, made a lucky guess this year in his prophetic almanack. He says, ” On January 11th a great catafalque will be erected in Rome !” He also says, ” another will be required on February 10th.”  [ I rather like the slightly sneering tone of this, being written before the Pope’s death as obviously ridiculous, and the astrologer being almost spot-on. But given that the Pope was eighty six, it’s not a bad guess.]

THE LATE KING’S DEBTS:  The late King, it is stated, unified his large debts some two years ago, and borrowed of a bank  at Turin 15,000,000 lire, of which 7,000,000 have been paid. King Humbert takes this debt on himself, and will not burden the country with it.

ROYAL ECONOMY:  It would appear that economy is to be studied a little by the new King ; 1,000 horses are to be sold at once out of the Royal stables, and the estate also at Castel Porziano. The Royal stables, built at an enormous cost by the late King, are one of the sights of the city, on account of their vast size and completeness in every respect. It is said that, all told, 2,000 persons are employed in them.

SACRILEGES IN ROME:  During the great concourse of strangers into Rome for the late King’s funeral no less than three churches were broken into, and the tabernacles were robbed of the sacred vessels, the consecrated hosts being strewn about.

FEB. 2, 1878:  The anniversary of the First Communion of the  Holy Father, February 2nd, will be the 75th anniversary of the Holy Father’s first Communion, made at Sinigaglia, his native city. The Cardinal Vicar of Rome invites all the faithful, and especially the young, to make a Communion on that day. There will be a grand function at the Gesù.

MONUMENT TO VICTOR EMMANUEL:   The proposed monument to Victor Emmanuel  has set all the painters, architects, sculptors, and  engineers to work, and many designs are already exhibited ; they all bear evidence of the haste with which they have been drawn, and nothing at all remarkable has been produced. They talk much of a grand façade to Sta Maria degli Angeli ; and that the hemicycle in front should become a colonnade, crowned by the statues of the statesmen and others connected with the unification of Italy, the new street, the Via Nazionale, to be entered under a grand triumphal arch.

THE REQUIEM FOR KING VICTOR EMMANUEL.—On the 9th of February a funeral service will be celebrated in the Pantheon for the repose of the soul of the late King Victor Emmanuel.

The above text was found on p.16, 2nd February 1878, in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

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Rome – 5th January 1878

1878 was a busy year in Rome. Vittorio Emmanuele II died on the 9th January. A month later the Pope died; Pius IX was the longest serving Pope ever, and the last pope who held temporal powers, though Lazio, and Rome itself were absorbed into the Kingdom of Italy in 1870. Meanwhile  Mgr Henry O’Bryen seems to be settled in splendidly, having stopped being a parish priest in Lancashire five years earlier at the age of thirty eight, and moved to Rome. He’s certainly in grand company at the dinner at the English College, with two Cardinals, and Archbishop Eyre, the first post-Reformation Archbishop of Glasgow, who was also Henry’s sister’s godmother’s nephew. [ His sister Cecilia (1846 -1856) ]

Mgr HH O’Bryen

The following all comes from The Tablet on 5th January.

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
Rome, Dec. 31, 1877.

THE HOLY FATHER:  The health of the Pope improved perceptibly  during last week. On Sunday he was  moved for a few hours to the private library, a room separated from the Pope’s bedroom. only by a passage, which serves as his dining-room. His Holiness does not use the spring couch, or chair, procured from Paris by Cardinal de Falloux, but continues in bed, supported in a sitting posture by a contrivance which enables him to sit up without feeling fatigue. Cardinal Manning attended the audience on Sunday and other days this week. Cardinals Bartolini and Randi have recovered sufficiently to enable them to visit his Holiness, and to be present at the audiences which, since the 23rd, have been daily held in the private library. On Christmas Day the Pope received visits from the Cardinal Vicar, many Cardinals, and from some of the great officers of the Court, including Marquis Serlupi, General Kanzler, &c., &c.

On the 27th, the name day of his Holiness, the audience was attended by Cardinals Manning, Howard, De Pietro, Caterini, Consolini, Giannelli, Sacconi, Pecci, Pacca, Ferrieri, D’Avanzo, Franchi, Guidi, Franzelin, Hohenlohe, Bilio, Bonaparte, and De Falloux, as also by the Senator of Rome, Marchese Cavalletti ; Prince Ruspoli, the Bishop of Clifton, and others.

THE CONSISTORY:  On the 28th a Consistory was held by his Holiness in person. The Consistorial Hall was not used. The Throne Room, the throne being removed, was arranged with chairs for the Cardinals, who assembled at half-past 10 a.m. to the number of thirty-five, or thereabouts. All the Cardinals now in Rome attended, except their Eminences Amat, Asquini, and Brossais Saint Marc, who were unable to be present owing to illness (the Cardinal of Rennes will, it is hoped, be able to attend the next Consistory on Monday, the 31st). Mgrs. Martinucci and Cataldi, the Pontifical Masters of Ceremonies, attended, and the latter read the Acts of Consistory and conducted the ceremonies. At a given signal the Cardinals left the Throne Room and proceeded to the Pope’s private library, where the Consistory proper was held. His Holiness spoke in a clear voice a few words, not a formal allocution, as follows ” Venerable Brothers,—Your presence here to-day in such numbers gives Us an opportunity which We gladly seize to re-turn to you and to each of you Our most sincere thanks for the kind offices you have shown to Us in this time of Our illness. We thank God that We have found you Our most faithful helpers in bearing Our burden of the Apostolic ministry; and your virtue and constant affection have contributed to lessen the bitterness of Our many sufferings. But while We rejoice in your affection and zeal we cannot forget that we need daily more and more your co-operation and that of all Our brethren and of all the faithful, to attain the immediate aid of God for the many pressing necessities of Us and of the Church. Therefore We urgently exhort you, and especially those of you who exercise the episcopal ministry in your respective dioceses, as well as all the pastors who preside over the Lord’s flock throughout the entire Catholic world, to implore the Divine Clemency and cause prayers to be offered to God that he may give • Us, amidst the affliction of Our body, strength of mind to wage vigorously the conflict which has to be endured, to regard mercifully the labours and wrongs of the Church, to forgive Us all Our sins, and for the glory of His Name to grant the gift of good-will and the fruits of that peace which the angelic choirs announced to man-kind at the birth of the Saviour.”

The following appointments to churches were then made:-

  • Archbishopric of Nazianzum, in partibus infidelium, Monsignor Angelo di Pietro, translated from Nissa in partibus. (To be sent as Delegate-Apostolic to the Republics of Paraguay, Chili, and Bolivia, and the Argentine Republic.
  • Archbishopric of Chieti, with Vasto in administration, Mgr. Luigi Ruffo de’ Principi di Scilla, born in Palermo.
  • Bishopric of Fano, Rev. Camillo Santori, Rector and Pro-fessor of Dogmatic Theology in the Roman Pontifical Seminary, Sub-Secretary of Vatican Council, &c.
  • Bishopric of Tricarico, Rev. Camillo Sicilian de Marchesi di Rende, formerly a parish priest in the diocese of Westminster, &c., &c.
  • Bishopric of Nice, Rev. Father Matthew Victor Balain, Oblate of the Congregation of Mary Immaculate, Rector of the Seminary of Frejus, &c., &c.
  • Bishopric of Pella in partibus, Rev. Gustavus Leonard di Battice, President of the Ghent Seminary, &c., &c., deputed co-adjutor, with succession, to the Bishop of Ghent.

His Holiness then created Mgr. Vincenzo Moretti (born in Orvieto November 14, 1815), Archbishop of Ravenna, to be a Cardinal Priest ; and Mgr. Antonio dei Conti Pellegrini (born in Rome August 11, 1812), Clerk of the Apostolical Chamber, to be a Cardinal Deacon. (They receive the titles respectively of Santa Sabina and Santa Maria in Aquiro.)

The pallium was then demanded for two archiepiscopal sees, those of Baltimore, the first see in the United States and of Chieti. Baltimore has the precedence of Chieti, but as Mgr. Ruffo Scilla, the new Archbishop of Chieti, appeared in person, he took precedence in postulating of Dr. D. J. O’Connell, the Procurator of Archbishop James Gibbons, the American Primate.

On Sunday Cardinal Caterini, the Dean of the Cardinal Deacons, in his private chapel in the Palazzo Mattei, imposed the pallium on the shoulders of the new Archbishop of Chieti, and on the shoulders of the Procurator (Dr. D. J. O’Connell) of Archbishop Gibbons, of Baltimore, the oaths of fidelity being first administered to the recipients of the pallium. Mgr. Cataldi officiated as Pontifical Master of Ceremonies.

Triduums have been celebrated in the three great Basilicas and in other churches in Rome, to pray for the complete restoration of the health of the Holy Father.

Dr. Chatard will be appointed Bishop of Richmond, Virginia, at an early meeting of the Propaganda, and will accept that see unless his Holiness should express a desire to retain his services in Rome. If Dr. Chatard becomes Bishop of Richmond, Dr. Hostlot, the present esteemed Vice-Rector, will be made Rector of the North American College in Rome, vice Mgr. Chatard.

 

PROTESTANT CHURCH IN ROME: The Free Italian church on the Piazza Ponte S.  Angelo (which is rarely open) was, however,  lighted up a few evenings ago ; and an Englishman might be seen preaching in English, with an Italian interpreting. In front of the pulpit was a table, with bread and wine on it, for the purpose of celebrating an English Dissenting communion. Every evening the Piazza is filled with the soldiers from the neighbouring barracks, who stand about talking and smoking in a very innocent manner until the “retreat “ at 7 p.m. calls them in. The parody of divine worship going on seemed to afford them much amusement, for they kept passing in and out through the little building, dignified by the name of a church, and wondering what it all meant. Apparently the Catholic religion has little to fear front the very feeble attacks of the Protestant sects. The Waldensian sects advertise a ” Christmas tree “ as one of the attractions of their chapel.

PIAZZA NAVONA: Quite a little fair is going on in the Piazza Navona, where may be purchased very prettily-constructed grottos, and all the figures that adorn a ” Presepio,” or representation of the Nativity. The three Magi, the shepherds, the sheep and cattle, and all the accessories are really very cleverly executed.

THE SECOND CONSISTORY; His Holiness held another Consistory this morning in his private library, sitting, as on the previous occasion, in a bed made for him in Rome under the direction of Doctor Ceccarelli, and gave the hats, with the customary formalities, to Cardinals Regnier, Manning, Brossais Saint Marc, Moretti, and Pellegrini. The Pope’s voice was clear and strong. His Holiness seems to be gathering strength, and bore the fatigue of the ceremonial well. Several noblemen and gentlemen were admitted to this Consistory. Several Bishops were nominated, amongst others Dr. Fitzgerald to the See of Ross, Ireland.

DIOCESE OF WATERFORD.—Monsignor Kirby has presented his Holiness with the sum of £1,700 from the Bishop (Dr. Power), the clergy, and faithful of the Diocese of Waterford and Lismore.

THE ENGLISH COLLEGE.—Dr. O’Callaghan entertained at dinner on the 30th, at the English College, Cardinal Manning, Cardinal Howard, Protector of the College, Archbishop Eyre, the Bishop of Clifton, Monsignor Stonor, Mgr. Cataldi, Monsignor Kirby, Dr. Grant, Dr. Hostlot, Dr. O’Bryen, Mr. Ward, Mr. Winchester, &c., &c.

The above text was found on p.17,5th January 1878, in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

 

St. Anselm’s Society For The Diffusion Of Good Books 1885

At first sight this seems to be rather dull, but worthy.  The more one reads on however some of the wording weaves between barking mad and rather sinister  “selecting such books as were free from danger to faith and morals”,…..  “their suitability to different kinds of readers”… “all would agree with him that the increase of infidel and harmful literature was unprecedented.”.. “Such literature was abhorrent to every Christian soul”…  Still at least it gave great great granny something to do.

 

The General Meeting of this Society was held on Wednesday afternoon, at Archbishop’s House, Westminster. His Eminence the Cardinal Archbishop presided, and amongst those present were the Bishop of Emmaus, the Marquis of Ripon, Lord Herries, the Very Rev. W. Lockhart, Inst. Char., the Revv. J. Bagshawe, D.D., G. Akers, H. Bittleston, J. Biemans, E. Lescher, S. McDaniel, H. Arden, Sir John and Lady Marshall, Colonel Prendergast, Mrs. Roper Parkington, Mrs. and Miss Clerke, Mr. Wegg-Prosser, Mr. Allies, Mr. Lyall, Miss Pownall, Mr. Bell, Mr. Britten, Mr. George Blount, Dr. Laing, Mr. Bellasis, &c.

The REV. CANON WENHAM, the Hon. Secretary, read the Report.

Its First Establishment.—St. Anselm’s Society was first set up in the year 1860. The original design of it was mainly due to the late Father Formby, who did not, however, continue long in connection with it, but left it to others to carry the design into execution. Those who were most instrumental in this were the late Lord Petre and the late Father Knox, of the Oratory, the present Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster, with the Very Rev. Father Morris, the Very Rev. Father William Eyre, Mr. Lloyd, the secretary, and the present secretary. The Society continued for several years in its work, collecting subscriptions and making grants of good books free, or at half price, and was in this way the means of putting several thousands of pounds’ worth of such books into circulation. But after a time the support given to it fell off, and the applications made to it became fewer and fewer. One cause of this was that the Society was expected to make a reduction to subscribers on all its books to an extent which, especially under the altered conditions of the book trade, it was not possible to make. That it did not entirely fall to the ground has been due to the support given to it by the President of the Conference of St. Vincent de Paul, Mr. Blount, who undertook the office of secretary, and kept it going during many years of discouragement.

A Fresh Start.—It may be well to explain briefly the circumstances that have led to its making a fresh start. It was partly because during the last two or three years the mischief done by indiscriminate reading of the books of the day has become more apparent and more frightful. Those who watch over us, as they that must give account of our souls, do not cease in pastorals and sermons and synodical letters to insist and enlarge on this danger. And the Holy See has repeatedly spoken on this subject in the strongest terms. With this conviction on their minds, the spirit of some who were well acquainted with our schools and colleges was stirred within them on seeing how little was being done to form in our young people a taste for wholesome literature and a conscience about indiscriminate reading, and that even the few books that were lent to the pupils to read or given them as prizes were often not of the kind that would be likely to cultivate their taste or excite their intelligence. It appeared on investigation that those who had to select the books oftentimes did not know what to order. They could not tell the character of books from their titles, and were at the mercy of booksellers and publishers, who, if not without knowledge of the books, were without knowledge of their suitability to the classes for whom they were ordered, and who were under special temptations to supply their own books, whether suitable or not. Here, then, it was thought, was a useful work for a Society like that of St. Anselm. If it could do little with the world at large to check unwholesome literature, yet at least it might give a helping hand to the hundreds and hundreds of our own convent schools and colleges throughout the country, that the money they laid out—and it must amount to a large sum each year —in books for prizes and school libraries, might be well laid out in books of the best sort for each class of readers It might be useful not only in selecting such books as were free from danger to faith and morals, but were the best of their kind, the most elevating and invigorating. And further, it might classify them according to their subject and character, and their suitability to different kinds of readers. With this view, then, the Council of St. Anselm’s Society set to work about a year ago to make a fresh start. It began by seeking for a local habitation in a central position, and had the good fortune to find, after some little search, its present premises, which, though not large, are sufficient for the purpose, and are in the neighbourhood of nearly all the similar institutions of London, and only five doors from the Strand at Charing Cross. And it has also been fortunate in finding a competent person, and experienced in bookselling, in the present manager. Busi; ness was thus commenced in a quiet way last June. The premises were fitted up sufficiently to make a beginning, and the Depository furnished with the books set down on its first lists.

Lists of Books.—These lists consist of the names of books selected from the catalogues of different publishers for their suitability to particular classes of readers. Nine such lists have now been issued ; the first was a list marked (C), of books suitable for libraries in elementary schools, with a second part (D), for the more advanced classes. For now that the education department recommends the establishment of such libraries, and takes them into account in awarding the mark of merit to the school, it seemed important to furnish lists of books that could be recommended for such libraries in Catholic schools. The next lists were (K), prize books for colleges, and (L), for convent schools, for it seemed deplorable that the large sums of money that are spent in this way should be laid out in books taken by chance or as the interest of the bookseller might direct, and not rather books such as we should really desire the pupils to make a study of. Two more lists (E and F), were next got out, the first for parochial libraries, and the second for more general and advanced readers. A short list (H) was printed of the best books of spiritual reading, with a supplement (G) of books of religious ‘instruction. But this last, at the suggestion of a high authority, has been expanded into a list of books of doctrine and controversy on the subjects of the day. This list is intended to answer, as far as may be, the questions so often asked as to what book is the best to explain particular doctrines and difficulties, to answer particular questions on religion, or to lend to people in particular states of mind or stages of advance towards faith and submission to the Church. The last list just published (M) requires a little special notice, as it differs from all the others in consisting, not of books selected and recommended as good books, but of books that may he read. People, it was urged, do not now buy the books they read, but hire them. If you wish, it was said, to direct their reading, you must look over the lists of books in the subscription libraries and tell them which they may read, and you must remember that if you attempt to restrain their reading too much about the subjects of the day, because these are dangerous, the most weak and least virtuous will only seek to emancipate themselves from a control which leaves them, as they think, behind the rest of the world. This was the argument, and the Society thought that at all events it would be doing a good work in forming a list selected from the subscription libraries of books which were the most safe and the least objectionable, while of course there are a large number of these books which are not only unexceptionable, but excellent.

Advantages.—The question is sometimes put to us, What advantage do we get by going to St. Anselm’s Society for books? Do you give a greater reduction than we can get elsewhere ? The answer is that we do not want to oppose or undersell the trade, but help to encourage it by making known the best works of all publishers. Nor could we undersell booksellers if we would, for the reduction made on cash sales is already as large as can be borne. While, therefore, St. Anselm’s Society invites readers to come to it for knowledge and choice of books, it does not ask that other booksellers should be left, and all orders should be sent to itself. Yet while it makes no profession—as at the time of its first establishment— of reducing the price of books below that of the trade, yet it is quite ready to reduce it as much, and in fact it makes a reduction of 25 per cent. all round, including those hooks which are dealt with exceptionally by the trade. Any one may take one of St. Anselm’s lists of selected books and tick off those he desires to have, and may send the list and a cheque for three-fourths of the whole sum to which the marked prices amount, and the Manager will send him the books, carriage free. There are publishers who will do as much with regard to their own books ; but St. Anselm’s Society will do this about the books of other publishers—about all good books—taking upon itself all the incidental expenses that may be the result of so doing. So far as this, then, the Society does offer some special advantages to those who order parcels of selected books.

Reprinting and Publishing,.—Lastly, the Society is ready to under-take the publication of books. There are not a few very good works which are out of print and cannot be obtained, and there are books indifferently translated and edited of which new editions are much wanted. The Society will readily enter into terms for reprinting such books, or publishing new works, so long as they are of a kind that falls within its scope, And as its great aim and end is not to make money, but to encourage and spread good books, it can afford perhaps more than others to be ” sweetly reasonable “ in dealing with editors and authors.

Officers and Associates.—Since the re-establishment of the Society it has had the misfortune to lose its President, Lord Petre. The members of the Society have reason to cherish his memory, of one who always endeavoured to attend its meetings, and showed great interest in its work, which he did his best to promote. The Council at their last meeting in January elected Lord Herries to fill his place, which he has kindly consented to do. At the same time the Council elected as permanent members of i is body a number of distinguished literary men, in order that it may have the benefit of their guidance, as well as their support, in any important questions of their. policy or work. The Council also elected eight members to manage the ordinary business of the Society, half of whom are to retire each year by rotation and their places to be filled up by election. Besides the permanent Council of authors, the Society has been able to obtain a valuable addition to its influence and working power in its Associates. When it began its fresh start a certain number of ladies, who felt the great importance of its work, engaged to give it their help, and united in an Association for Promoting the Reading of Good Books in Mission and School Libraries and Charitable Institutions. The Society now numbers forty of such associates, and is grateful to them for the valuable assistance they have given, especially in the selection of books. It has no better hope of success in its work than through the co-operation of these ladies, who will use their personal influence in their own localities to prevail on those about them to feed on good and wholesome literature, instead of what is poisonous.

Finance.—And now, in conclusion, something must be said as to the condition of the Society’s finances. And here we regret to have to make an admission which will have the tendency to set every right-minded Englishman against us. But the truth must be told—we have no balance at our bankers. The Society’s expenditure, indeed, during the past year, has, notwithstanding great economy, been fairly respectable. It has had the rent of the depository to pay for, to fit it up and furnish it with a decent amount of books ; it has had to pay for the printing of lists and circulars; to keep a manager and his assistant; to meet the expenses of advertising, petty cash, and sundries. We fear to injure our character in the world’s estimation by saying for how little all this was done. But it has not been done fur nothing; and—this is the disgraceful part of the story—it has not been done on our income. Our income is not respectable. We are surrounded by Societies like the Christian Knowledge Society, the Pure Literature Society, and others, whose income is counted by thousands. But St. Anselm’s Society set out last year with the modest sum of £86 13s. 8d., handed over by the late secretary. It has now about one hundred subscribers. Its total receipts from them during the past year and a quarter have amounted to £300. If St. Anselm in those old days, when he used to come to Mortlake to keep the feast of Easter, could have had a vision of the financial position which the Society bearing his name would hold in comparison with the non-Catholic Societies, he might have perhaps prophesied worse days for the Church in England than even those of William Rufus.

And now what is to be said in extenuation of the offence of having allowed expenditure to outrun income? This much. First, that no one need be under any apprehension for the Society, as care has been taken that the liability for this extra expenditure should fall entirely on those that are responsible for it. Secondly, a large portion of the expenses are incidental to the setting up of the Society’s business, and will not recur. Like every business it has to make a venture, but a reasonable venture, in order to get into working order and make itself known. Thirdly, the standing expense of the Depository is ono that may be expected to be met by the business done, and this though small as yet is increasing, and has begun to contribute towards current expenses. There is no reason why the business of St. Anselm’s Society in bookselling should not pay its expenses as well as any other bookselling business if it succeeds ; and it is beginning to succeed. But no doubt it must, at least in the first instance, depend on the support it receives from subscriptions. At the outset it must appeal for help towards its working expenses. And it appeals earnestly also for assistance to furnish the Depository with specimen copies of books, to make grants of books to charitable institutions, and to enable it to reprint and publish books that are called for. Other institutions of this kind are liberally supported by their own adherents, and the Society of St. Anselm appeals to the Catholic body to give it liberal aid for one or more of these objects, that it may be able worthily to represent Catholic interests in the literary world.

The MARQUIS OF RIPON, in moving the adoption of the Report, said his task was a very easy one, because he was sure that those who had listened to it while it was being read—giving as it did so clear a history of the objects and proceedings of this Society—would feel that the Society was well worthy of the support of English Catholics. The main object of the Society, as set forth in the Report was this : ” If it could do little with the world at large to check unwholesome literature, yet at least it might give a helping hand to the hundreds and hundreds of our own convent schools and colleges throughout the country, that the money they laid out—and it must amount to a large sum each year—in books for prizes and school libraries, might be well laid out in books of the best sort for each class of readers.” Any one who had had to select prizes for schools and colleges, especially in the country, must have felt the difficulty of making anything like a good selection. What happened generally was this—they went to the nearest bookseller, and chose those books which were nicely bound, and at the same time within the amount they had to spend. Generally there was very considerable difficulty, and the result was that the prizes were not always of the character they ought to be. The selection depended upon the extent of the bookseller’s stock, and this was particularly the case when they wanted books suitable to Catholic societies. Not only was the value of the prizes diminished, but there was the risk that no small amount of mischief might be done. It must always be remembered that prize books were not only to be admired for their bindings, but they were to be read and studied, and they came into the hands of the students with all the authority of the school to recommend them.

It seemed to him, therefore, that the work this Society was doing in issuing the lists of which the Report spoke, was very useful and valuable work indeed. It performed for Catholics a work which was done for Anglicans by the wealthy societies like the Christian Know-ledge Society and others. It was most important that those who have the management of the education of the young, should have a ready means of obtaining suitable books for children. Another important branch of the work was the list of books in circulating libraries  and looking over that list, he could not help remarking that it was drawn up in no narrow or restricted spirit. He did not think he need detain them any longer. He moved the adoption of the Report, and in doing so he commended St. Anselm’s Society to the continued support of its friends and of Catholics at large, confident that it was doing a very valuable work, while the state of its funds was not creditable to those who ought to sustain it with liberality.

The REV. G. AKERS, in seconding the motion, said : No one could mix as the clergy and many of the laity did with the people, and especially with the poor, without seeing the taint cast into their lives and their faith by reading books, not actually bad, but which contained the suggestion of what was evil. Many books were based upon false principles, and, although admired by all for their artistic merit, yet were as a snake in the grass. Who was to help them in the selection of books ? To make a right selection one had to look into the books, and for each of them to do that separately for themselves was rather a waste of good labour, while the result was, after all, unsatisfactory. That being so, these lists became very valuable to those who felt keenly the curse of this bad literature, and yet who found the work of selection a great difficulty. They wanted some one to help them in that matter, and to tell them which books were safe from the insidious danger of hidden wrong. The British spirit was inclined to resent any interference in matters of this kind, so that this work must be done very gently. It was impossible to have it done more gently than it was by this Society. They had to protect their people and children in their words as well as in their acts, and he did not see how any one could find fault with so excellent a Society as this. He hoped that they would not forget that the work of the St. Anselm’s Society was not merely the keeping of a store—its aim and ends was the diffusion of good books. They had to make a new start, and new work must be carried out. He hoped that fresh ways would be found by which good books might he diffused amongst the people, and he was certain that the work would grow immensely. They must take it up in a solid and earnest way worthy of the Church, and so check the spreading of the curse and poison of bad literature. The motion to was then agreed to nem. con.

LORD HERRIES, in moving the second resolution, said he must preface the few remarks he was about to make by saying how honoured he felt some months ago when he was elected President of this Society. He had taken great interest in the Society, and was attracted to it at first by the name of St. Anselm. He thought he ought, as President, to tender his thanks to his Eminence the Cardinal Archbishop for allowing them to come there for the meeting, and for his kindness in taking the chair on this occasion. The resolution he had to propose was really one to inform the public what the Society was. He proposed : ” That while the diffusion of good books is at all times a useful_and desirable object, it becomes especially important at the present time when immoral, heretical, and infidel publications are circulated to an unprecedented extent amongst all classes.” When the Society was founded some twenty years ago, the circumstances were not so bad as they were at present, and all would agree with him that the increase of infidel and harmful literature was unprecedented. Such literature was abhorrent to every Christian soul, and it was time for a Society like this to spread in Catholic society books which had a healthy tone ; the spread of healthy literature not only would prevent people reading bad books, but it would have a still greater effect in keeping the seeds of faith in the minds of our countrymen. They wanted the support of the clergy in this matter, and he believed that if the clergy took an interest in the formation of parish libraries they would be doing a great deal of good. In Yorkshire there was a mechanics’ union of village libraries, including 180 villages with 200, ow books. He did not see why they should not have Catholic village libraries, with this Society as the headquarters of such a movement.

The REV. DR. BAGSHAWE seconded the resolution. There was, he said, no doubt about the increased power of the press in these days, but while its power was increasing its tone was growing worse. The only way to meet this state of things was to descend into the field, and by producing and circulating good books use the same weapons as their enemies, provide good sound literature for the poor, not only for their own people, but for the masses of the population generally.

The motion was agreed to.

COLONEL PRENDERGAST next moved : ” That since the tendency of the popular literature of the day has become a subject of earnest solicitude to the Holy See ; and since the Bishops of England, in a Synodical Letter, have called on the Catholic laity to aid in counteracting the evil agencies at work through the medium of cheap publications, it becomes an urgent duty on the part of the faithful at large to take measures for responding to their appeal.” He confessed that he had been very much struck by the Report that had been read to the meeting, and he congratulated the Secretary, Canon Wenham, upon its production. It opened up so large a scope for this Society, that he could only venture to make a few remarks upon one or two points in it. He could not conceive how any class could be excluded from the operations of the Society, and he would therefore put in a claim for young persons of the higher classes. In middle and higher class schools there was a great disposition to reading, such as hardly existed some years ago. He remembered the formation of a school library at Eton, which at the time was regarded as an extraordinary thing, but now all large schools had their libraries. They were creating amongst the youth of the country a great appetite for reading, and with that came a certain responsibility upon those interested in young people to see that when they left school they would know how to choose the good and leave the evil books. He thought the circulating library list was especially valuable, and he said that more particularly as the father of a family.

In this country they had a wonderfully good literature, they had a mass of good books, and he was delighted to find that Canon Wenham had been at the trouble of preparing these useful lists. They wanted to know in some accessible way what to order from the circulating libraries which in modern days were powerful organisations. He believed that Mudie’s Library first came into existence to supply a clientele of evangelical proclivities, and that that was the making of that celebrated library. He was not sure that they could not get some lending libraries to order books to suit Catholics. He was delighted to find that general literature was not to be discouraged, because every now and then a book would appear—a book perhaps trifling apparently, but which would effect a revolution. They all knew that some years ago the places of worship in the Established Church were not what they ought to be, but now it was frequently difficult to know at once whether they were in a Catholic or an Anglican Church. He believed that the change was to be attributed, in a great measure, to a little book published some years ago called St. Autholicus. It was not, he thought, beyond the scope of this Society to encourage some kinds of ephemeral literature which would have a powerful effect for good. One word more : there was a slight note of despondency which perhaps was not to be wondered at, in the concluding sentences of the Report, but he did not think that they could always judge of the work of a Society, or of its true value, by the state of its funds. The officials no doubt were apt to take that view, but work like that of this Society had means of touching people of which the Society itself had no conception. A general effect was produced even by small means. He could only hope that the words of his resolution would find a response in the hearts of Catholics, and that the laity of the Church would rouse themselves and put themselves in contact with this Society to their own advantage and for the promotion of education in this country.

The VERY REV. W. LOCKHART, in seconding the motion, said he should confine his remarks for the most part to cheap literature. Colonel Prendergast very properly pointed out the importance of wholesome literature for the educated classes, but there was one thing which must be weighing on every Catholic who comes into contact with the masses of the people. He was sure it weighed on the heart of his Eminence and on the hearts of many priests who have to do with the people. That was that they were being ruined in thousands by cheap and bad literature. It was clearly one of the objects of this Society to do what could be done for all classes. It was the one Society they had for promoting Christian knowledge—the one Society which had the right to that high title. They had heard what it had been able to do in the course of its twenty years’ existence, and while they gave all credit and praise to those who had been foremost in the work of the Society, yet he thought they must all feel a tingling of shame when they considered that it bad done no more. Twenty years or more of life and that was all that it had been able to do. How was it that Catholics could do no more ? He spoke of the laity, for the clergy were so full of work. The Church of England and the dissenting bodies were examples in this respect which they ought to imitate. They were put to shame by what the Protestants—the Samaritans—were doing. He heard it said by Mr. Spurgeon that when a man went to him reproach-ing himself with his wasted life and neglected opportunities, that eloquent preacher would say : ” What are you going to do for other people, if you turn to God you must love your neighbour, for how can you love God, whom you have not seen, if you love not your neighbour whom you have seen.” Mr. Spurgeon puts his people into harness, and those who knew what was being done at Newington amongst a debased population, know the immense amount of good that was being done by the laity—both men and women—gathered round that preacher. There were many other instances to be found to show what the Samaritans were doing to shame the true Church. The country was being ruined and souls were being destroyed in thousands by bad literature. What were the Catholics doing to prevent this circulation of garbage, and to give better books in its stead ? His experience was this, that the laity did not sufficiently co-operate with the clergy. The Church of England laity and others supported their large societies for promoting Christian knowledge, &c., by large subscriptions and donations. He would be pleased if this meeting put into their hearts a practical and persevering zeal to imitate what was being done by others outside the true Church.

The resolution was agreed to unanimously.

The CARDINAL ARCHBISHOP said be had listened with great interest to the Report of this Society, which was founded nearly twenty-five years ago. There was, however, one great omission in the Report, and that was the name of Canon Wenham amongst those who have been associated with the Society from the beginning. The importance of this Society was immense, and he felt that to be so when twenty-five years ago he was asked to support it. He was very glad to be reminded of a fact he had quite forgotten. Four years after the foundation of this Society—in 1864—it fell to his lot to obtain the sanction of the Holy Father Pope Pius IX. to this Society. He had forgotten the fact. He was afraid that he had done very little but sympathise with this work. Lord Herries had been kind enough to thank him for receiving them that day and for presiding. He hoped that this Society from this day would meet there—this house would always be open to It seemed to him that a Society of this sort could not be under a better roof than his house. So many things had been touched upon that he would confine what he had to say to the importance of a society for the dissemination of good books. He was very often asked questions which perplexed him as to whether this or that book would be on the Index or not. He could not answer such questions, but it was perfectly certain that in this country all they could do was to sail at the Index without any hope of ever reaching it, just as a sailor sailed for the North Pole. Although it was impossible to lay down definite rules in this matter, yet they should keep the rules of the Index before their minds, and that was what this Society had done. He was glad to find that there was a large amount, of innocent and instructive literature before them, and Canon Wenham had exercised a wise discretion in issuing these lists of books. He could recollect the history of the Christian Knowledge Society. It was originally in the hands of a Protestant firm, but it was found that that firm were deriving a very large profit. It was determined to take it out of their hands, and to create a Society to carry on the whole machinery of a large trade. The effect of that was to enormously increase the circulation of the books, and good authors were attracted to the Society. The books the Christian Knowledge Society published were most beautiful and instructive, and they were written by some of the best men of the day. Books they could get for eightpence were valuable beyond anything they possessed in other ways. It fell to his lot to go into this subject, and he had received a proposal upon this subject which possibly might be accepted with advantage. When he saw that the St. Anselm Society had discernment and discretion in the selection of books—when he saw that they lacked nothing but capital, it struck him that the Society might make terms with some large firm of publishers, and so enormously increase the operations of the Society. They did not want to make a profit, but only to multiply good books. The proposal before him which he thought the Society would accept, might enable them to begin a Catholic Literary Society something like the Christian Knowledge Society. He would ask Canon Wenham to confer with him on the subject.

The BISHOP OF EMMAUS in moving a vote of thanks to the Cardinal Archbishop, said that the meeting had gladdened his heart. The work of the Society might have been a small work, but it was good work. The work of selecting books was indeed most important. With regard to the Christian Evidence Society, when he recently went into that Society’s shop he was amazed with what he saw. He had noticed with regret the death of Mrs. Ewing, whose little book called Jack-a-Napes, he regarded as an admirable work, and he had recently given no fewer than twenty copies of it away.

The vote of thanks having been seconded by CANON WENHAM, it was briefly acknowledged by his Eminence, and the proceedings then terminated.

The above text was found on p.26, 23rd May 1885 in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

St Patrick’s Day in Rome 1878

CARDINAL MANNING AT ST. ISIDORE S.

The Church of St. Isidore’s, Rome, was thronged to excess on the 17th of March, St.  Patrick’s Day, with the English and Irish residents in Rome, Protestant as well as Catholic, who flocked to hear a sermon preached by his Eminence Cardinal Manning. Long before the hour fixed for divine service every seat in the church was occupied. A Capuchin prelate had promised to pontificate, but owing to some accident was unable to attend, and there was no High Mass. Shortly after I I a.m.

 

 

 

Cardinal Manning

Cardinal Manning entered the pulpit and gave out as his text, St. James ii., 12, ” So speak ye, and so do, as being to be judged by the law of liberty.” His Eminence gave an interesting sketch of the life and labours of the Apostle of Ireland, and enlarged upon the firmness and constancy of the Irish people, who for fourteen hundred years had kept the faith, in spite of fierce persecution, and had carried the Catholic religion into America, Australia, and other distant dependencies of the English Crown. The Cardinal’s sermon was listened to with breathless attention, and at its close a collection was made for the benefit of the Irish Franciscan Fathers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cardinals MacCloskey, Manning, and Howard were subsequently entertained at dinner by the Very Rev. the Guardian of St. Isidore’s. Among the other guests of the Franciscans on this occasion were Archbishop Eyre, Dr. Strain, Archbishop elect of St. Andrew’s ; the Bishop of Clifton ; Mgrs. Carli, Cataldi, Agnozzi, and Rinaldini ; the Prior of St. Clement, the Very Rev. Dr. Hostlot ; Canon Walsh, Rev. Dr. O’Bryen, D. Shine Lalor, Esq., the Prior of Sta. Maria in Posterula, the Very Rev. Dr. Doyle, Captain Balfour, Mr. Shakspeare Wood; Rev. I. Healy, Dr. De la Roche, Mr. Lane Connolly, and Mr. Winchester.

The above text was found on p.15, 23rd March 1878, in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .

The Benevolent Society for Aged and Infirm Poor, 1886

At least five members of the family were at this one. They’re starting to become part of the Catholic great and the good………………  Stuart Knill (no relation) was the first Catholic Lord Mayor of London since the Reformation, when he was elected six years later.

On Monday night the Annual Dinner of the Benevolent Society for Aged and Infirm Poor was held at the Albion Hotel, Aldersgate street.

Mr. Alderman Stuart Knill presided, and among those present were the Bishop of Southwark, the Bishop of Portsmouth, the Bishop of Emmaus, the Right Revv. Mgr. Canon Gilbert, V.G., and Mgr. Goddard ; the Very Revv. Canons Wenham, Moore, O’Halloran, McGrath, and Murnane, V.G., Father Aubry, and Dr Kelly, 0.S.A. ; M. l’Abbe Boyer and M. l’Abbe Toursel ; the Revv. J. Aukes, J. Bloomfield, J. J. Brenan, T. H. Burnett, D. Canty, T. Carey, G. Carter, P. Cavanagh, S. Chaurain, G. Cologan, J. Connelly, W. J. Connolly, C. A. Cox, G. S. Delany, E. English, M. Fanning, W. Fleming, T. Ford, F. A. Gasquet, 0.S.B., T. F. Gorman, W. Herbert, James Hussey, P. McKenna, T. F. Norris, C. O’Callaghan, D. O’Sullivan, E. Pennington, L. Pycke, T. Regan, F. Stanfield, L. Thomas, and E. J. Watson ; Judge Stonor, Mr. Alderman Gray, Mr. Deputy Young, K.S.G. ; Captain Kavanagh, Mr. J. Roper Parkington, Captain Shean, Dr. Ratton, and Messrs. W. A. Baker, J. Bans, Jun., W. Barrett, E. Belleroche, E. J. Bellord, John G. Bellord, M. Bowen, Augustin Boyle, Arthur Butler, George Butler, Jun., John Conway, E. Curties, F. H. Dallas, V. J. Eldred, R. M. Flood, E. J. Fooks, Garrett French, C. Gasquet, L. Gasquet, T. J. A. Grew, J. D. Hallett, W. B. Hallett, A. Hargrave, H. D. Harrod, J. Hasslacher, A. Hernu, J. J. Hicks, H. J. Hildreth, J. Hodgson, Alfred Hussey, James Hussey, John Hussey, Thomas Hussey, Thomas Hussey, Jun., William Hussey, J. B. Ingle, G. Pugh-Jones, W. Keane, Jun., J. M. Kelly, J. E. S. King, John Knill, Denis Lane, F. D. Lane, M. G. Lavers, C. Temple Layton, Dudley Leathley, F. Harwood Lescher, C. E. Lewis, Sidney Lickorish, W. H. Lyall, James PP. McAdam, James Mann, F. K. Metcalfe, J. Morris, W. J. O’Donnell, D. O’Leary, Thomas Osborn, Jun., Bernard Parker, Joseph J. Perry, Charles Petch, A. Pinto-Leite, Edmund Power, P. P. Pugin, Alfred Purssell, F. Purssell, E. Rimmel, E. W. Roberts, E. Rymer, Michael Santley, J. Scully, J. H. Sherwin, L. W. Stanton, C. F. Taylor, M. E. Toomey, W. Towsey, E. J. S. Turner, J. T. Tussaud, James Wallace, Thomas Welch, Stephen White, and J. J. Cooper-Wyld.

In proposing the health of the Pope, the Chairman said that his Holiness Pope Leo XIII., the two hundred and fifty-eighth occupant of the most ancient of thrones, was conspicuous by his watchfulness over Catholic and Christian interests and by his resistance to the powers of evil by which those interests were menaced. His wonderful Encyclical Letters on the great questions of the day were acknowledged by all to be perfect models of what should come forth from the true Shepherd of the sheep. Called on to arbitrate in international disputes ; called on to assert himself as the protector of his children in whatever part of the world they might be, he had by his justice and self-sacrifice won for himself the admiration of all—he had won for himself the hearts of his own children, and he had gained the veneration and respect of those who did not look upon him as their spiritual head. They were on the threshold of that year when the Holy Father would celebrate the jubilee of his priesthood ; and he asked them to fill their glasses and drink, as of old, to our “Bon Pere—his Holiness Pope Leo XIII”.

The toast having been received with great enthusiasm and drunk with musical honours, the health of the Queen and the members of the Royal Family was next given.

In proposing this, The Chairman said that civil power came from God, and was so closely allied to the spiritual that he had a great desire to unite the two toasts. It was a happy coincidence that while the Pope would celebrate the jubilee of his ordination, her Majesty would celebrate the jubilee of her coronation. They had for fifty years had the happiness of having a Sovereign who by her gentle sway, by her heartfelt sympathy with the joys and sorrows of our people, had gained the hearts of her subjects and justly deserved the title of Queen of our Hearts. And what was true of her Majesty was equally true of her Royal children. The Prince of Wales was ever amongst them taking part in every work which could promote the happiness and welfare of their fellows. He asked them to heartily drink the health of her Most Gracious Majesty and long life to the Prince and Princess of Wales.

The next toast was “The Health of the Cardinal Archbishop.”

In proposing this, the Chairman said that he regretted that their beloved Cardinal Archbishop was prevented from being present that night. They all knew the part which his Eminence took in any movement having for its object the alleviation of the sufferings of the poor. It was not for him to enter into details concerning his Eminence, but they all knew that he was ever ready to sacrifice everything for the good of his flock. By those outside the Church the Cardinal was looked upon as a true Englishman ; he had by his ability, by his gentleness, and by his readiness to take a part in every movement for the benefit of his fellows gained the respect and admiration of all with whom he had come in contact. They well knew the interest he took in their society, the love he had for the poor and aged. His constant visits to their annual gatherings ; his constant appeals to them not to forget that though other charities might be of more interest, they could never allow those old men and women whom their society regarded as their special objects of care, to want at all events any little comforts of life which they could supply, showed the interest he took in their society.

The Bishop of Emmaus, in responding to the toast, said that all through life the Cardinal Archbishop had devoted himself to the good of his fellows. The Prince of Wales, speaking of his Eminence, had said : “I consider Cardinal Manning a true patriot.” Those words certainly deserved their attention. However some of his countrymen might disagree with his Eminence on certain points, they all knew that he was a practical man ; they knew that he never spoke at random. What he did he did after mature consideration. It was indeed a subject for very great rejoicing that his Eminence had gained for himself the admiration and esteem of all classes of Englishmen. No one regretted the absence of the Cardinal that night more than he did, but his Eminence had asked him to make the appeal which he himself would have done had he been amongst them. He was sure that all were desirous of helping any movement once they were assured that it was deserving of their sympathy. He knew of no work more worthy of their charity than the providing for the poor and aged. The annual subscriptions for the year, he regretted to say, had fallen off £100. It was true that they had no increase in the number of their pensioners. Under the circumstances it would not be prudent to add to the number of their pensioners ; but nevertheless it was sad to see any falling off in the subscriptions.

Since the last report of their society no less than £5,484 had been paid to the poor pensioners in weekly instalments, and in otherwise helping them. He rejoiced to be able to say, especially in the presence of their chairman, that the merchants and bankers in the City of London had shown as much generosity as ever to their society, and that they contributed the magnificent sum of £500. He would not speak of Mr. Arthur Butler in his presence, but they knew well his exertions on behalf of the society. He was sure they would contribute generously that night. Their alms would be well bestowed. Many of the poor aged and infirm people, unable to earn their livelihood, had sought relief of the society, but the society could not go beyond its means, and so many applicants had to be refused its assistance. Many of these poor had seen happier and brighter days, and it was indeed hard to refuse them aid. But they could not do more than their means would allow. He could not help alluding to the death of one who had taken a deep interest in their society, and had laboured zealously on its behalf, the late Dr. Hewett. He felt certain that they would contribute generously to a work so well worthy of their sympathy, and thus show their interest in the oldest Catholic charity for the relief of distress in the great city where they dwelt.

The health of the Bishop of Portsmouth was next proposed by the Chairman, and that of the Bishop of Southwark by Judge Stonor, and the remaining toasts of the evening included the health of the Bishop of Emmaus, the clergy of Westminster and Southwark, Mr. Arthur Butler, the Stewards, and the Chairman.

The above text was found on page 36, 27th November 1886 in “The Tablet: The International Catholic News Weekly.” Reproduced with kind permission of the Publisher. The Tablet can be found at http://www.thetablet.co.uk .